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I'm new to Stackoverflow and I wonder, why almost everybody writes samplecodes with a static main() and output like here in first answer: some ugly main

from some ugly main:

But what you posted looks like it's just a properties file. Try this:

import java.io.FileInputStream; 
import java.util.Properties; 

public class Main { 
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception { 
        Properties properties = new Properties(); 
        properties.load(new FileInputStream("test.properties")); 
        System.out.println(properties.getProperty("ReferenceDataLocation")); 
        System.out.println(properties.getProperty("LicenseKey")); 
        System.out.println(properties.getProperty("foo")); 
    } 
} 

which will print:

as
al
null

wouldn't it be nicer to write it as JUnit Test? It's easier to read. You can verify the result with just CTRL+C + CTRL-V + RunAs -> JUnit and see what is expected (or not).

Am I wrong with this idea?

I would write the main as this:

import static org.hamcrest.MatcherAssert.*;
import static org.hamcrest.Matchers.*;

import java.io.ByteArrayInputStream;
import java.util.Properties;

import org.junit.Test;


public class TestSomeInputStreamAsProperties {

    String someFileAsString =
    "ReferenceDataLocation = as\n"+
    "       \n" +
    "       \n" +
    "       ##############################################################################\n" +
    "       #\n" +
    "       #   LicenseKey\n" +
    "       #       Address Doctor License\n" +
    "       #\n" +
    "       ##############################################################################\n" +
    "       LicenseKey = al\n";



    @Test
    public void whenReadingFromSomeInputStreamWeShouldGetProperties() throws Exception {
        // Arrange
        Properties properties = new Properties(); 
        // Act
        properties.load(new ByteArrayInputStream(someFileAsString.getBytes())); 
        // Assert
        assertThat(properties.getProperty("ReferenceDataLocation"), is("as"));
        assertThat(properties.getProperty("LicenseKey"), is("al"));
        assertThat(properties.getProperty("foo"), is(nullValue()));
    }
}

The question is: why would I write a sample with main() and output? why don't users try to get on the JUnit train and start writing tests to verify their code?

+

Another Question: why don't people post their problems as JUnit tests?

I'm kinda disappointed.

EDIT: - don't get me wrong about this. It's just expectations > reality ;) I think stackoverflow is still a great site and I will write here all my problems and try to help others to solve theirs. I thought, JUnit is more spread and it would be appreciated by your community to focus on solving problems with JUnit.

Instead I realise that it is not wanted. Wouldn't you be disappointed too?

share|improve this question
    
This is a community site, so rather than being disappointed, why not contribute and change things by doing? Also, does it really make much difference? A good portion of questions asked on here are by students and those without much experience, who probably don't know about JUnit or its uses outside of just writing tests. –  spikeheap Nov 4 '11 at 10:15
    
That was my thought, that's why I asked this question. I started to answer questions with JUnit Tests, wrote UnitTests by myself as question and I would love to spread JUnit over the world to make it a better place. –  MartinL Nov 4 '11 at 10:44
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Seasoned open source developers with experiences in several high profile projects know, that best chance to get patch approved and integrated is to provide failing unit test along with fixing patch. But such people are mostly answering questions here - not asking.

So it is task for answerers to promote good asking practices by up/downvoting questions and writing meaningfull comments.

share|improve this answer
    
do you mean, that I can/should ask questions with JUnit samples? –  MartinL Nov 4 '11 at 10:29
    
It depends on situation. Reporting an issue in some project is bestdone with unit test against this project (it will be easy for developers to reproduce it in own build infrastructure, even easier when it is a patch). Asking general question can be a case for main or unit test. Most people working with java will have IDE which easily allows to run supplied class either as main or as unit test - IntelliJ IDEA does not care. –  Konstantin Pribluda Nov 4 '11 at 10:33
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Not everybody has JUnit, so a simple program with just main() is more likely to run anywhere.

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I started totally motivated answering questions with JUnit methods :S I guess I will provide my answers with main() –  MartinL Nov 4 '11 at 10:31
    
@MartinL You can still use the assert keyword, so it feels a bit like a unit test :) –  Philipp Reichart Nov 5 '11 at 12:58
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A JUnit test is not an SSCCE in that it is not self contained.

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I think JUnit is on it's best way there. You can import JUnit4 with Eclipse just by CTRL + 1 or click. I don't know about other tools if they have it in their repertoire. –  MartinL Nov 4 '11 at 10:40
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wouldn't it be nicer to write it as JUnit Test?

Not really.

It's easier to read.

Only if you're experienced with that particular unit testing framework. And even then I'd say that it's as easy to read, not easier.

You can verify the result with just CTRL+C + CTRL-V + RunAs -> JUnit and see what is expected (or not).

Only if you're using an IDE and already have a project with that testing framework set up.

Sample code should demonstrate one specific thing and not introduce additional concepts and dependencies.

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1  
How many IDEs you know, which do not have junit enabled almost by default? –  Konstantin Pribluda Nov 4 '11 at 10:34
    
@Konstantin: All of them, I'd wager - and note how you used the word "almost". JUnit may be present, but will usually not be automatically included in new projects. After all, some people will want to use TestNG. –  Michael Borgwardt Nov 4 '11 at 10:40
    
Tell me which is easier to read: System out println properties getProperty "ReferenceDataLocation" … which will print “as” OR Assert that properties get property "ReferenceDataLocation" is “as” That's the whole thing about JUnit and Hamcrest –  MartinL Nov 4 '11 at 11:40
    
If you go on and extract String referenceDataLocation = properties.getProperty("ReferenceDataLocation") you'll get Assert That referenceDataLocation is "as" –  MartinL Nov 4 '11 at 11:47
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One (probably the only) advantage of main() is that it's a sort of common least denominator - the code should be understandable and reproducible by anyone, no matter what is their dev environment and favourite testing framework (you can bet some people would have a proprietary one - cause they think JUnit is crap, or dodgy corporate standards or whatever). But if you feel more comfortable with JUnit, just do that - maybe others will like it and start doing the same. "It's a Free World..."

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Good boy and good question. Do not do as a bad boys do! People that run ugly main instead of JUnit or TestNG tests are bad boys! :)

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