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If you want to assign the same style to a group of descendants, why isn't there an easy way to do this with CSS?

Say you have an HTML table as follows:

<table id='myTable'>
  <tr>
    <th></th>
    <th></th>
    <th></th>
  </tr>
  .
  .
  .
  <tr>
    <td></td>
    <td></td>
    <td></td>
  </tr>
</table>

Why do you have to style all column headings and cells with the following selector?

#myTable tr, #myTable td {}

Why isn't there a syntax similar to the following?

#myTable (tr,td) {}
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If you want that syntax you may extend your editor to automatically expand it to the standard-compliant form. –  Török Gábor Apr 29 '09 at 7:07

4 Answers 4

Why isn't there a syntax similar to the following?

#myTable (tr,td) {}

Quite simply because nobody bothered to propose a useful syntax... until as recently (relative to the time you posted this anyway) as 2008, as an :any() pseudo-class. This was discussed in greater depth a little later.

In any case, the first implementation has surfaced from Mozilla, albeit as late as 2010 as :-moz-any():

#myTable :-moz-any(tr, td) {}

The following year, it would be suggested that WebKit follow suit, with :-webkit-any():

#myTable :-webkit-any(tr, td) {}

But if one were to use them together right now, then due to selector parsing rules one would have to duplicate the rules, making one's code even longer:

#myTable :-moz-any(tr, td) {}
#myTable :-webkit-any(tr, td) {}

Making them pretty useless in that regard. I'd limit their use to vendor-specific code, rather than make use of them in general authoring code.

The new Selectors level 4 working draft has a proposal for a :matches() pseudo-class, which is obviously based on the original :any() proposal but may see certain enhancements as the draft is revised:

#myTable :matches(tr, td) {}

Of course, since it's a new draft, don't expect browser support until much later (maybe a year or so?).

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You can group selectors by using the vendor specific -moz-any() and -webkit-any().

Please see the MDN reference on this, and the W3C recommendation on the :matches() pseudo-attribute.

Cheers!

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The latest W3C selectors recommendation is level 3, not 4. Selectors 4 just went into early drafts at the time you posted this. –  BoltClock Nov 11 '11 at 16:31

You might want to look into SASS - http://sass-lang.com

It allows you to write CSS in a more sensible way (similar to what you suggested), but ti still compiles down to plain old CSS.

For example:

#myTable{
    background: #CCC;

    tr{
      border: 1px solid #EEE;
    }

    td{
      background: blue;
    }
}
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Short of taking it up with the W3C, you could use jQuery for a similar sort of thing

$('#myTable').find('tr, td');

Of course, JS isn't always enabled and it would not be a good idea to rely on this. You're just going to have to list out all your selectors!

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@alex - tx, I was wondering what the history/rationale was of precluding this type of thing in CSS –  eft Apr 29 '09 at 3:50
    
Probably just the W3C doing things a bit funny... they do that a bit. –  alex Apr 29 '09 at 3:52

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