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I know I'm looping twice in the following code for no reason. How could I go the following loop of records in one step instead of first selecting them and then performing actions on it.

merchants = Merchant.all.select do |merchant|
  merchant.url.present? && merchant.url != merchant.new_data.url
end

merchants.each do |merchant|
  merchant.url = merchant.new_data.url
  merchant.save!
end

I bet it's something very simple -- I'm new to Ruby so all this is new to me.

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Does merchant.save! save even when no attributes have been modified? –  Andrew Grimm Nov 4 '11 at 11:51
    
No, I'd only like to update it if the new data is different (hence the first select to only get those records. –  Hopstream Nov 4 '11 at 11:52
    
Why? For performance reasons? –  Andrew Grimm Nov 4 '11 at 11:56
    
Yes. Since the tables have millions of records. –  Hopstream Nov 4 '11 at 12:00
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It's conceptually ok to iterate over data on separate steps (this allows modularization and composability). Granted, this may be a bit inefficient when using strict structures (as opposed to lazy ones) like Ruby arrays, but no worries for small/medium arrays. Anyway, of course you can join the logic in one step, like this:

Merchant.all.each do |merchant|
  if merchant.url.present? && merchant.url != merchant.new_data.url
    merchant.url = merchant.new_data.url
    merchant.save!
  end
end
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Wouldn't this solution iterate over all merchants? –  Mark Thomas Nov 4 '11 at 13:37
    
@Mark. Yeah, I just translated the code in the question. If I had thousand of merchants I'd use find_each for example. In another question I already advised the OP to use scopes instead of Ruby loops but I guess he finds it easier to do it in Ruby. –  tokland Nov 4 '11 at 14:14
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It will be quite inefficient doing Merchant.all when you have millions of rows, especially if they have many large fields. I would move the selection logic into the ActiveRecord query, something like this (untested):

Merchant.includes(:new_data).select(:url).where("url IS NOT NULL").where("url != new_data.url")
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Doesn't Merchant.all.select build a similar query? Or does it get the entire table and then loop to remove non-matching items from a hash? –  Hopstream Nov 4 '11 at 13:21
    
Hmm... it might. Certainly Merchant.all.each will not. Do you even need the all? –  Mark Thomas Nov 4 '11 at 13:31
1  
+1. I would create scopes in Merchant to reuse the code, but that's in fact the good way to do it, filtering at SQL level. –  tokland Nov 4 '11 at 14:15
    
Scopes are a good idea. –  Mark Thomas Nov 4 '11 at 14:26
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This will check for nil merchant url

merchants.each do |merchant|
  merchant.url = merchant.url || merchant.new_data.url
  merchant.save!
end
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Could ||= also be used? –  Andrew Grimm Nov 9 '11 at 22:37
    
Yes you can do that –  Ross Nov 10 '11 at 3:52
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