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I have this dictionary mappings declared as a Dictionary<string, HashSet<string>>.
I also have this method to do stuff on a hashset in the dictionary:

public void DoStuff(string key, int iClassId){
    foreach (var classEntry in
             from c in mappings[key]
             where c.StartsWith(iClassId + "(")
             select c)
    {
        DoStuffWithEntry(classEntry);
    }
}

private void DoStuffWithEntry(string classEntry){
    // Do stuff with classEntry here
}

In one case, I need to do this on a number of keys in the mappings dictionary, and I was thinking it was better to rewrite and filter on a list of keys instead of calling DoStuff for each key to optimise the execution.

Currently I do this:

DoStuff("key1", 123);
DoStuff("key2", 123);
DoStuff("key4", 123);
DoStuff("key7", 123);
DoStuff("key11", 123);

Logically something like this instead of calling DoStuff for each (FilterOnKeys is not a method - just what I want...):

    foreach (var classEntry in
             from c in mappings.FilterOnKeys("key1", "key2", "key4", "key7", "key11")
             where c.StartsWith(iClassId + "(")
             select c)
    {
        DoStuffWithEntry(classEntry);
    }
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It sounds like you want:

string[] keys = { "key1", "key2", ... }
var query = from key in keys
            from c in mappings[key]
            ...;

foreach (var entry in query)
{
    ...
}

(I would personally use a separate variable for the query just for readability - I'm not too keen on the declaration bit of a foreach loop getting huge.)

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Will this approach perform better than my origianl version, or is it just a matter of "cosmetically" simplifying the expression? –  awe Nov 7 '11 at 7:39
1  
Cosmetic simplification really. Fundamentally, .NET dictionaries don't allow you to look up multiple keys in one go. If you were using LINQ to SQL or something like that, there could well be better alternatives. –  Jon Skeet Nov 7 '11 at 7:41
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You can make use something like this

var ids = {1, 2, 3};  
var query = from item in context.items             
where ids.Contains(item.id )             
select item; 

in your case

string[] keys = { "key1", "key2", ... }
 var query = from key in keys             
  where ids.Contains(keys  )             
   select key ; 
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you could linq your way through mappings EDITED i missed a nesting level, he wants to query hashsets not the whole dictionary

public void DoStuff(IEnumerable<string> key, int iClassId)
{
    mappings.Where(i=>key.Contains(i.Key)).ToList().ForEach(obj=>
    {
        foreach (var classEntry in
             from c in obj.Value
             where c.StartsWith(iClassId + "(")
             select c)
        {
            DoStuffWithEntry(classEntry);
        }
}

changed key parameter and from c ... section.

you call it like this

string[] keys = new string[]{"key1", "key2", ... , "keyN"};
DoStuff(keys, 123);

this should work

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This causes the value of classEntry to be the HashSet contained as Value for the Dictionary - not looping through each value of the HashSet. –  awe Nov 4 '11 at 11:54
    
you're right, i missed a step here. i'm updating code –  Alex Nov 4 '11 at 13:10
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