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I am using SQL server. In that I have a row value as

cc:x@gmail.com cc:y@gmail.com james cc:q@gmail.com

In the above I have to get the value "james" as the output.

replace(column_name,substring(column_name, CHARINDEX('cc:',column_name), CHARINDEX('.com',column_name)+4),'')

Using the above, I have removed the first occurence of cc:x@gmail.com and now I have to remove the next two occurence of cc:..@gmail.com

Thanks in advance

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Is the field always in that format, i.e. [cc:email] [cc:email] [name] [cc:email] –  Ash Burlaczenko Nov 4 '11 at 11:50
    
No the format may be different eg: [name] [cc:email] or [cc:email][name] it goes so on. –  user1029572 Nov 4 '11 at 12:29
    
I rewrote my answer to fit your new description –  t-clausen.dk Nov 7 '11 at 9:27
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4 Answers

declare @txt varchar(1000) ='cc:x@gmail.com cc:y@gmail.com james cc:q@gmail.com'

;with split as
(
select 1 f, charindex(' ', @txt+ ' ', 2) t
union all
select t+1, charindex(' ', @txt+ ' ', t+1)
from split
where charindex(' ', @txt+ ' ', t+1) > f
)
select substring(@txt, f, t-f) from split
where not substring(@txt, f, t-f) like '%@%'

Result:

james

EDIT:

I changed the sql to fit your exact requirement:

create function f_returnnames(@txt varchar(1000))
returns varchar(1000)
 as
begin
declare @returntext varchar(1000)

;with split as
(
select 1 f, charindex(' ', @txt+ ' ', 2) t
union all
select t+1, charindex(' ', @txt+ ' ', t+1)
from split
where charindex(' ', @txt+ ' ', t+1) > f
)
select @returntext = coalesce(@returntext + ' ', '')  + substring(@txt, f, t-f) from split
where not substring(@txt, f, t-f) like '%@%'

return @returntext
end

go

You can test it here:

select (select dbo.f_returnnames(column_name)) names
from 
(select 'cc:x@gmail.com cc:y@gmail.com james cc:q@gmail.com' column_name) a
share|improve this answer
    
I like it, mostly because it's like mine but uses fancier features. –  Sorpigal Nov 4 '11 at 12:21
    
Hi, thanks a lot for ypur reply. i will try this and let you know –  user1029572 Nov 4 '11 at 12:30
    
Fantastic! I didn't even think of CTEs. –  Filip Popović Nov 4 '11 at 12:43
    
hi t-clausen.dk will you please do the same by using a column_name. I am getting error while replace the hard coded value to column_name thanks –  user1029572 Nov 4 '11 at 14:16
    
@user1029572: You have to modify the initial select to pull from your table and then make sure your column_name column is in the output column set so that you can call substring on it later. –  Sorpigal Nov 4 '11 at 17:46
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May I presume that what you want is always the non-email-address? Let's say "I want to extract the first string in a space-delimited list of strings which doesn't look like an email address" where "look like an email address" is interpreted as "contains an @". Is that close enough?

create function get_me_that_james(@v nvarchar(max)) returns nvarchar(max) as
begin
    declare @email nvarchar(max),  @pos int;

    set @pos = 0;
    select @email = substring(@v, @pos, charindex(' ', @v, @pos) - @pos)
    while(charindex('@', @email) != 0) begin
        set @pos = charindex(' ', @v, @pos) + 1;
        select @email = substring(@v, @pos, charindex(' ', @v, @pos) - @pos);
    end
    return @email;
end

Then call it

select dbo.get_me_that_james('cc:x@gmail.com cc:y@gmail.com james cc:q@gmail.com');
share|improve this answer
    
I tested your script. It works fine as long as there is a name in the text. 2 names will return 1 the first name of course. Problem is when there is 0 names. Endless loop. –  t-clausen.dk Nov 4 '11 at 12:37
    
This is very good solution if OP can live with "contains an @" condition and name is single word condition. It will fail only if james is written as j@mes or James Smith. Probably the best way to go would be with regular expressions. –  Filip Popović Nov 4 '11 at 12:39
    
AFAIK j@ames would be an invalid email address - that is, it's not valid to have an @ in the user portion of the address. A valid email address can contain a space if it is properly quoted, which this ignores; certainly a better parser is in order. –  Sorpigal Nov 4 '11 at 12:57
    
hi filip, how to do regular expression for the condition you said. i am having the value as " cc:x@gmail.com cc:y@gmail.com james smith cc:q@gmail.com " what i have to do for this –  user1029572 Nov 4 '11 at 14:47
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EDIT: it will work only with .com mail addresses.

You have to do multiple REPLACEs. Use a WHILE loop to detect if there is cc: to be removed. Here is complete scalar function code:

CREATE FUNCTION FN_STRIPCC(@COLUMN_NAME NVARCHAR(200))
RETURNS NVARCHAR(200)
AS
BEGIN
    WHILE (CHARINDEX('cc:', @COLUMN_NAME) > 0 )
    BEGIN
        SET @COLUMN_NAME =  replace(@column_name,substring(@column_name, CHARINDEX('cc:',@column_name), CHARINDEX('.com',@column_name)+4),'')
    END
    RETURN @COLUMN_NAME
END

Then You can use it:

SELECT dbo.FN_STRIPCC('cc:x@gmail.com cc:y@gmail.com james cc:q@gmail.com')
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Pretty sure this will fail if the email addresses are not .com –  Sorpigal Nov 4 '11 at 11:54
    
Yes it will, I used REPLACE like OP proposed. Question was: "now I have to remove the next two occurence of cc:..@gmail.com" note it has .com in the end –  Filip Popović Nov 4 '11 at 12:04
    
It's just a little special-case for me. If it solves the problem, great, but I wonder what happens if there's a line that doesn't precisely conform. –  Sorpigal Nov 4 '11 at 12:10
    
Probably the best way would be to use regular expressions but that is another topic (enable CLR in SQL Server, ...). That way, algorithm will be as good as your regular expression. And performance may be an issue. Soripgal's answer is very good if it suits You. –  Filip Popović Nov 4 '11 at 12:35
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SELECT name
FROM Persons
where emailid='cc:address@example.com'
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