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I've done some looking around and it seems the solution to the problem seems to be to change the content header of the file so it's not treated as a regular image.

This is all well and good and I've attempted to write an image handler to do so. The problem is that the images I'm using come in multiple formats. I'll be using jpg/png/tiff/eps.

My plan was to use the Bitmap class to open the file, and then save to the output stream using :

Bitmap bmap = new Bitmap(context.Server.MapPath(imagePath));
bmap.Save(context.Response.OutputStream, ImageFormat.<Format goes here>);

The problem is that .Net doesn't seem to support the eps extension so how do I deal with these files. Am I taking the right approach?

Thanks

EDIT:

I actually used a combination of both your suggestions to come up with:

// determine what type of file to send back   
switch (Path.GetExtension(imagePath))
{
    case ".png":
        context.Response.ContentType = "image/png";
        context.Response.AddHeader("content-disposition", "attachment; filename=" + fileName + ".png");
        break;
    case ".jpg":
        context.Response.ContentType = "image/jpeg";
        context.Response.AddHeader("content-disposition", "attachment; filename=" + fileName + ".jpg");
        break;
    case ".tiff":
        context.Response.ContentType = "image/tiff";
        context.Response.AddHeader("content-disposition", "attachment; filename=" + fileName + ".tif");
        break;
    case ".eps":
        context.Response.ContentType = "image/postscript";
        context.Response.AddHeader("content-disposition", "attachment; filename=" + fileName + ".eps");
        break;
}

context.Response.WriteFile(context.Server.MapPath(imagePath));
context.Response.Flush();

Seems to have done the trick - thanks both for your help!

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1  
No problem - if our answers are both incomplete, it might be a good idea to answer your own question and then mark it as the answer (rather than posting the solution in your question!) –  Sir Crispalot Nov 4 '11 at 12:54
    
Yea I tried to do that but it said I had to wait 8 hours - I'll update tomorrow :-) –  alimac83 Nov 4 '11 at 14:05

2 Answers 2

I would suggest using the WriteFile method available on context.Response followed by a call to Flush, ie:

Response.WriteFile(context.Server.MapPath(imagePath));
Response.Flush();

Hope this helps.

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Have you heard of the content-disposition header? It allows you to tell the browser to ask the user what to do with the file, rather than try and handle it by itself. I don't think it is part of the HTTP spec, but it is documented by the IETF under RFC 2183.

There is some documentation on MSDN showing how to add the required response headers.

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