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I am working on a project in python in which I need to extract only a subfolder of tar archive not all the files. I tried to use

tar = tarfile.open(tarfile)
tar.extract("dirname", targetdir)

But this does not work, it does not extract the given subdirectory also no exception is thrown. I am a beginner in python. Also if the above function doesn't work for directories whats the difference between this command and tar.extractfile() ?

share|improve this question
    
extractfile() doesn't write a file to the disk, it just gives you a python object. extract() writes to the disk. – ed. Nov 4 '11 at 12:14
    
OK it gives you a file object just, can i use that file object if its a tar file to extract it ? – gaurav Nov 4 '11 at 16:41
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Building on the second example from the tarfile module documentation, you could extract the contained sub-folder and all of its contents with something like this:

with tarfile.open("sample.tar") as tar:
    subdir_and_files = [
        tarinfo for tarinfo in tar.getmembers()
        if tarinfo.name.startswith("subfolder/")
    ]
    tar.extractall(members=subdir_and_files)

This creates a list of the subfolder and its contents, and then uses the recommended extractall() method to extract just them. Of course, replace "subfolder/" with the actual path (relative to the root of the tar file) of the sub-folder you want to extract.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for telling me exact code, I was thinking of the same method, Actually in the tarfile module documentation its written just member I thought a member could be a directory also so I asked. Thanks for your help. – gaurav Nov 4 '11 at 16:40

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