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I writing a class for points and vectors.I want to use them to calculate dot and norm of vectors. These are point and vector classes

public class Point {
    public float x,y;
}
public class MyVector {
       public Point start,end;
}

I write these code for dot calculation the dot.

public float dot(MyVector v) throws Exception
{
   if( (start.x != v.start.x) || (start.y != v.start.y))
        throw new Exception("Vectors not begin in same Point");
}

I want to use this function to calculate vector's norm.

public float norm()
{
        return dot(this);
}

I know that the exception condition never occur for the norm function. So I won't to throw exception. I know that i can do this like bellow:

public float norm()
{
    try
    {
        return dot(this);
    }
    catch(Exception e)
    {

    }
}

But I think this is redundant. Is there a way for removing the try and catch in norm function?

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4  
Throw something that extends RuntimeException instead - you aren't required to try/catch unchecked exceptions. (See download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions/… ) –  BobG Nov 4 '11 at 12:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This intention cannot be expressed in java. Either function dot throws an exception or not.

You cannot give it a "hint" to specify that there are conditions in which an exception will never been thrown.

You can either live with that situation or switch to use RuntimeException only.

Or you could refactor it to something like this

public float dot(MyVector v) throws Exception
{
   if( (start.x != v.start.x) || (start.y != v.start.y))
        throw new Exception("Vectors not begin in same Point");

   return unchecked_dot(MyVector v)
}

where unchecked_dot performs the actual operation but does not check the arguments and does not declare to throw Exceptions.

public float norm()
{
    return uncheked_dot(this);
}
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There is no way within the java language.

The best way to handle this is with a comment and a rethrow.

For example, if you are using a write method that takes an Appendable but passing a StringBuilder then maybe you want to gloss over the fact that Appendable.append throws an IOException since StringBuilder never actually does this.

  try {
    write(myStringBuilder);
  } catch (IOException ex) {
    // Should never happen since StringBuilders do
    // not throw IOexceptions on append.
    throw new AssertionError(ex);
  }

Note that if you are wrong (now or in the future) about the ability of the delegate function to throw, then by rethrowing in an AssertionError, you give code maintainers more information about what went wrong.

If your project uses a logging system consistently, then logging can be a fine option if logging and dropping the exception would not violate any invariants.

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if you have a reason to believe that dot(...) should throw an exception, may be norm(...) should too. Eating up exceptions is not really a very good idea. But yes, if you do want to, you have to write a try catch. The only other option is that you could throw a RuntimeException from dot(...) in which case you don't need to catch.

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Not really, in this situation, dot() would throw something like illegal argument exception. However, this is not the case at norm() which doesn't take any argument. –  Krab Nov 4 '11 at 12:37
    
@Krab, that's a very valid point! –  aishwarya Nov 4 '11 at 12:48

Do not throw a plain exception.

Make a subclass of RuntimeException and - to make it easier to catch upstream - name it e.g. "DotUndefinedException".

When you do it with a runtime exception you do not have to specify it unless you explicitly want to handle it.

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