Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I try to delete a created directory in my destructor:

shutil.rmtree("C:\\projects\\project_alpha\\tmp")

It does not work with my python script but when I execute this command via python console it works and the tmp-directory will deleted.

Where is the difference?

share|improve this question
1  
What does "does not work" means? You get an error? You get no error and nothing is deleted? –  Joël Nov 4 '11 at 13:56
    
Assuming that the issue is a del method not being called my answer should help. Otherwise you should post the relevant portions of your code. –  Mike Steder Nov 4 '11 at 14:16
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I assume by "destructor" you mean the __del__ method.

From the docs on del

It is not guaranteed that del() methods are called for objects that still exist when the interpreter exits.

What you might want to do is register an atexit handler.

For example at module level:

import atexit

def cleanup_directories():
    directories = ["C:\\projects\\project_alpha\\tmp",]
    for path in directories:
        if os.path.exists(path) and os.path.isdir(path):
            shutil.rmtree(path)

atexit.register(cleanup_directories)

Functions registered with atexit will be run when the interpreter exits regardless of how the interpreter exits.

Of course, you could also do something hacky like force the garbage collector to run (import gc; gc.collect(), which may force your del method to run but I'm going to go out on a limb here and say that's a bad idea.

;-)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.