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I have monthly data in one data.table and annual data in another data.table and now I want to match the annual data to the respective observation in the monthly data.

My approach is as follows: Duplicating the annual data for every month and then join the monthly and annual data. And now I have a question regarding the duplication of rows. I know how to do it, but I'm not sure if it is the best way to do it, so some opinions would be great.

Here is an exemplatory data.table DT for my annual data and how I currently duplicate:

library(data.table)
DT <- data.table(ID = paste(rep(c("a", "b"), each=3), c(1:3, 1:3), sep="_"),
                    values = 10:15,
                    startMonth = seq(from=1, by=2, length=6),
                    endMonth = seq(from=3, by=3, length=6))
DT
      ID values startMonth endMonth
[1,] a_1     10          1        3
[2,] a_2     11          3        6
[3,] a_3     12          5        9
[4,] b_1     13          7       12
[5,] b_2     14          9       15
[6,] b_3     15         11       18
#1. Alternative
DT1 <- DT[, list(MONTH=startMonth:endMonth), by="ID"]
setkey(DT,  ID)
setkey(DT1, ID)
DT1[DT]
ID MONTH values startMonth endMonth
a_1     1     10          1        3
a_1     2     10          1        3
a_1     3     10          1        3
a_2     3     11          3        6
[...]

The last join is exactly what I want. However, DT[, list(MONTH=startMonth:endMonth), by="ID"] already does everything I want except adding the other columns to DT, so I was wondering if I could get rid of the last three rows in my code, i.e. the setkey and join operations. It turns out, you can, just do the following:

#2. Alternative: More intuitiv and just one line of code
DT[, list(MONTH=startMonth:endMonth, values, startMonth, endMonth), by="ID"]
 ID MONTH values startMonth endMonth
a_1    1     10          1        3
a_1    2     10          1        3
a_1    3     10          1        3
a_2    3     11          3        6
...

This, however, only works because I hardcoded the column names into the list expression. In my real data, I do not know the names of all columns in advance, so I was wondering if I could just tell data.table to return the column MONTH that I compute as shown above and all the other columns of DT. .SD seemed to be able to do the trick, but:

DT[, list(MONTH=startMonth:endMonth, .SD), by="ID"]
Error in `[.data.table`(DT, , list(YEAR = startMonth:endMonth, .SD), by = "ID") : 
  maxn (4) is not exact multiple of this j column's length (3)

So to summarize, I know how it's been done, but I was just wondering if this is the best way to do it because I'm still struggling a little bit with the syntax of data.table and often read in posts and on the wiki that there are good and bads ways of doing things. Also, I don't quite get why I get an error when using .SD. I thought it is just any easy way to tell data.table that you want all columns. What do I miss?

share|improve this question
    
You don't show what your annual data looks like, but since data.table has a merge method, I suspect you can simply merge the two sets of data without having to worry about this duplication. –  Andrie Nov 4 '11 at 13:56
    
@Andrie, that is my annual data. I just added two columns startMonth and endMonth that tell me with which monthly data I want to match DT. So after the duplication I can create the following identifier in the annual data: ID_MONTH and match that with the monthly data. –  Christoph_J Nov 4 '11 at 14:03
    
Sorry, I should have said monthly data. Still, I would do it the other way round. Have an indicator in the monthly that matches the annual (probably year) and just to a merge. Wouldn't that work? –  Andrie Nov 4 '11 at 14:10
2  
Here is a question by me I wrote months ago (I'm just rewriting my code) that gives more background on what I actually want to do: Matching_problem‌​. I think the problem is that I'm matching fiscal years and not real years and I don't have the fiscal year information in the monthly data. But maybe I'm overlooking something obvious. –  Christoph_J Nov 4 '11 at 14:17
    
That's a much more interesting question. If you ask that as a new question I'll provide an answer. –  Andrie Nov 4 '11 at 14:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Great question. What you tried was very reasonable. Assuming you're using v1.7.1 it's now easier to make list columns. In this case it's trying to make one list column out of .SD (3 items) alongside the MONTH column of the 2nd group (4 items). I'll raise it as a bug [EDIT: now fixed in v1.7.5], thanks.

In the meantime, try :

DT[, cbind(MONTH=startMonth:endMonth, .SD), by="ID"]
 ID MONTH values startMonth endMonth
a_1     1     10          1        3
a_1     2     10          1        3
a_1     3     10          1        3
a_2     3     11          3        6
...

Also, just to check you've seen roll=TRUE? Typically you'd have just one startMonth column (irregular with gaps) and then just roll join to it. Your example data has overlapping month ranges though, so that complicates it.

share|improve this answer
    
Ahah. cbind is the answer. Thank you. –  Andrie Nov 4 '11 at 15:32
    
Thanks, Matthew, glad I wasn't completely off. There is still hope for me, it seems ;-) –  Christoph_J Nov 4 '11 at 15:35

Looking at this I realized that the answer was only possible because ID was a unique key (without duplicates). Here is another answer with duplicates. But, by the way, some NA seem to creep in. Could this be a bug? I'm using v1.8.7 (commit 796).

library(data.table)
DT <- data.table(x=c(1,1,1,1,2,2,3),y=c(1,1,2,3,1,1,2))

DT[,rep:=1L][c(2,7),rep:=c(2L,3L)]   # duplicate row 2 and triple row 7
DT[,num:=1:.N]                       # to group each row by itself

DT
   x y rep num
1: 1 1   1   1
2: 1 1   2   2
3: 1 2   1   3
4: 1 3   1   4
5: 2 1   1   5
6: 2 1   1   6
7: 3 2   3   7

DT[,cbind(.SD,dup=1:rep),by="num"]
    num x y rep dup
 1:   1 1 1   1   1
 2:   2 1 1   1  NA      # why these NA?
 3:   2 1 1   2  NA
 4:   3 1 2   1   1
 5:   4 1 3   1   1
 6:   5 2 1   1   1
 7:   6 2 1   1   1
 8:   7 3 2   3   1
 9:   7 3 2   3   2
10:   7 3 2   3   3

Just for completeness, a faster way is to rep the row numbers and then take the subset in one step (no grouping and no use of cbind or .SD) :

DT[rep(num,rep)]
    x y rep num
 1: 1 1   1   1
 2: 1 1   2   2
 3: 1 1   2   2
 4: 1 2   1   3
 5: 1 3   1   4
 6: 2 1   1   5
 7: 2 1   1   6
 8: 3 2   3   7
 9: 3 2   3   7
10: 3 2   3   7

where in this example data the column rep happens to be the same name as the rep() base function.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I ran it (v1.8.7) but I don't see the NA. Which version do you have? –  Matt Dowle Jan 16 '13 at 15:05
    
Thanks. I still don't see NA but now I get two warnings both identical: In 1:rep : numerical expression has 2 elements: only the first used –  Matt Dowle Jan 16 '13 at 16:02
    
Try latest (796) as first step then, please, just to rule it out. –  Matt Dowle Jan 16 '13 at 16:38
    
Ok, I'll try again. Let's keep this one on S.O. then rather than datatable-help. Thanks ... –  Matt Dowle Jan 16 '13 at 18:27
    
@MatthewDowle I can reproduce the NAs by commenting out the last line or changing the assignment to something other than DT in the first block of code. I think DT <- DT[,cbind(dup=1:rep,.SD),by="num"] and DT <- DT[,cbind(.SD,dup=1:rep),by="num"] are meant to be alternatives, but the first replaces DT. –  user1935457 Jan 16 '13 at 19:21

Here is a function I wrote which mimics disaggregate (I needed something that handled complex data). It might be useful for you, if it isn't overkill. To expand only rows, set the argument fact to c(1,12) where 12 would be for 12 'month' rows for each 'year' row.

zexpand<-function(inarray, fact=2, interp=FALSE,  ...)  {
fact<-as.integer(round(fact))
switch(as.character(length(fact)),
        '1' = xfact<-yfact<-fact,
        '2'= {xfact<-fact[1]; yfact<-fact[2]},
        {xfact<-fact[1]; yfact<-fact[2];warning(' fact is too long. First two values used.')})
if (xfact < 1) { stop('fact[1] must be > 0') } 
if (yfact < 1) { stop('fact[2] must be > 0') }
# new nonloop method, seems to work just ducky
bigtmp <- matrix(rep(t(inarray), each=xfact), nrow(inarray), ncol(inarray)*xfact, byr=T)   
#does column expansion
bigx <- t(matrix(rep((bigtmp),each=yfact),ncol(bigtmp),nrow(bigtmp)*yfact,byr=T))
return(invisible(bigx))
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Carl, but I guess I'm sticking with the data.table approach provided by Matthew. –  Christoph_J Nov 4 '11 at 15:36

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