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I'm still a bit new to directshow filters and am studying the base classes closely. One thing that has come up almost immediately is the base implementation of CMediaType::IsPartiallySpecified.

It reads:

if ((majortype == GUID_NULL) ||
    (formattype == GUID_NULL)) {
        return TRUE;
} else {
    return FALSE;
}

but surely it should read:

if ((majortype == GUID_NULL) ||
    (subtype == GUID_NULL) ||
    (formattype == GUID_NULL)) {
        return TRUE;
} else {
    return FALSE;
}

It doesn't inspire confidence in the rest of the classes. Is there an errata published somewhere?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It should read the way it is, and it should not read the way you think it surely should read.

Partial means that major type and/or format type are intentionally omitted.

You will also be surprised that IsPartiallySpecified is almost not used within DirectShow SDK and dependent filter, and even if you break it the rest will still work rock solid. The idea around partially specified media types is to be able give a hint on filter capabilities. This still has a very limited use.

The implementation does not actually test the subtype. If there is a specified format type, the media type is not considered partial, even if the subtype is GUID_NULL.

Partial media type is something like major type and subtype only, for the input pin to say "Hey, I don't have media type to try but I think I have an idea what it should approximately look like".

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I'm not surprised to find it's not used. I wasn't interested in that function especially - I was using it as an indication of the quality of the base classes. Where did you get that quote in grey from? The bits of MSDN I have read so far mention if any of mediatype, subtype or format is GUID_NULL then it is partial. The comment above the IsPartiallySpecified function itself says so: // the type, subtype or format type can be null. Anyway, shouldn't dwell on it if it's not used :) –  David W-J Nov 4 '11 at 14:23
    
See "Remarks" in msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/… –  Roman R. Nov 4 '11 at 14:27
    
Thank you - it's strange that they went to all that trouble to write that paragraph in the remarks rather than just test all 3 cases in the first place (as the rest of the directshow docs seem to indicate you should). –  David W-J Nov 4 '11 at 14:39

DirectShow framework, as Roman R. put it, works rock solid. It is one of the more complicated API sets by Microsoft. You should judge it on its performance. The DirectShow samples provided in the Windows SDK are well-chosen and work.

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There's another point that you're missing. To fully define a media type, you need a major type and a format block, but many audio filters use FORMAT_WaveFormatEx and rely on the wave format tag to define the subtype, and in these cases the subtype is validly GUID_NULL but the media type is fully defined.

Generally speaking, the format block fully defines the media, and is both sufficient and necessary. The major type and subtype were intended to allow a degree of generic handling of data.

G

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