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What is the point of an enum being used for something like a switch statement when you then have to cast them to ints?

Isn't it just better to use a few const ints? I want to use enums but the cast makes them seem clunky. I thought they were meant to be ints but they're something else?

Do they have the same behaviour in C++?

sorry for the badly worded question, my brain is fried.

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9  
Your brain might be more fried than you think... you don't need to cast an enum to use it in a switch. –  Adam Houldsworth Nov 4 '11 at 14:12
1  
In C# you are not required to cast an enum as int in a switch command... Anyway is really easier to remember an enum (a name in our mind) than an integer value, don't you think? –  Marco Nov 4 '11 at 14:13
    
Did you do a bit of search here?? I am sure you shall see alot of threads on its usage. –  zenwalker Nov 4 '11 at 14:14
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10 Answers 10

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The entire point of enums are to make your code more readable. They are not casted to ints, since they are by default ints. The only difference is instead of going back and forth checking what int values you may have, you can have a clear set of enums to make the code more readable.

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They are not necessarily int, though by default they are. Talking C#. –  Adam Houldsworth Nov 4 '11 at 14:14
1  
They don't have to be backed by ints - for instance public enum Foo : byte { Bar } –  Ade Stringer Nov 4 '11 at 14:15
    
@AdamHouldsworth Good point. I've changed it to say by default. –  onit Nov 4 '11 at 14:17
3  
More importantly, they are not ints at all; they only convert implicitly to int. You can't assign an int to an enum without a cast, using an enum to instantiate a template will result in a different instance than using an int, typeid(v).name() will return a different string, etc., etc. –  James Kanze Nov 4 '11 at 14:25
1  
@JamesKanze Assigning an int to an enum is bad design, since generally you do not want to be remembering the int codes that your enums represent. Generally, if you are mixing enums and ints, you may not want to have it as an enum. Technically you are right. But I haven't seen enums used often in the ways you described. –  onit Nov 4 '11 at 14:48
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Enumerations have semantic value that helps your code be easier to read. They are a bit more useful than just using constant values themselves since you can group them together.

Think of an enum as a way of namespacing a group of related constant values.

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The main benefit of using an Enum is code readability. They group a logical set of values into something humans can (generally) understand quicker than a lot of numbers, or const declarations, scatter throughout a source file.

They provide a lot of value when dealing with things such as bit Flags and related binary operations.

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It is perfectly legal to switch on an enum, in both C++ and C#

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An enum is used mainly for readability and ease of understanding. They're pretty useful when using the Facade design pattern.

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In C++, the cast to int is not needed, so you can have the following compiling and working well:

enum e{
   V1 = 0,
   V2,
   V3
};

int main()
{
   e x = V1;
   switch (x)
   {
   case V1:
      break;
   case V2:
      break;
   case V3:
      break;
   }
   return 0;
}
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In C# there is no need to cast to an int. You can use:

switch (myEnumValue)
{
    case MyEnum.ValueOne:

        // Do stuff
        break;

    case MyEnum.ValueTwo:

        // Do stuff
        break;

    default:

        // Do stuff
        break;
}
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He's probably thinking if myEnumValue is an int...then I believe you have to cast either one or the other (in C#). –  Mark Nov 4 '11 at 15:27
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In addition to readability, you get enhanced type-safety (at least in C#).

In C#, if a function takes an enum, you will not be able to pass it a value outside the enum range.

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This is not correct. –  fearofawhackplanet Nov 4 '11 at 15:23
    
In C#, an enum creates a distinct type. It's like a boolean, if have have a function that takes a boolean, and try to pass it a value of 3, the compiler will not allow it. Try it. –  Steve Wellens Nov 4 '11 at 15:41
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There are several other benefits that come with the aforementioned type safety and readability benefits.

With some development IDEs (Visual Studio and others) you get intellisense when using enums. For example, if you used an enum as the switch value for your case statement, you would get intellisense when declaring each case.

Maintainability-wise you get a single location to change the integer values corresponding to the enum members.

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The whole point of enums is that they are not ints (although in C++ they can be implicitly converted into ints; I don't know about C#). This gives you extra type safety. For example, say in C++ you have:

enum open_type { open_read, open_write, open_readwrite, open_create };
enum exclusivity { exclusive, shared };
void open_file(char const* filename, opentype ot, exclusivity ex);

Then the following will give you a compile error:

open_file("foo.txt", exclusive, open_write);

If open_file only took ints instead of enums, then this error would not get caught.

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