Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I run this code:

StringBuffer name = new StringBuffer("stackoverflow.com");
System.out.println("Length: " + name.length() + ", capacity: " + name.capacity());

it gives output:

Length: 17, capacity: 33

Obvious length is related to number of characters in string, but I am not sure what capacity is? Is that number of characters that StringBuffer can hold before reallocating space?

share|improve this question
1  
Why downvote? :( –  Иван Бишевац Nov 4 '11 at 15:40
add comment

11 Answers 11

up vote 6 down vote accepted

See: JavaSE 6 java.lang.StringBuffer capacity()

But your assumption is correct:

The capacity is the amount of storage available for newly inserted characters, beyond which an allocation will occur

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes, you're correct, see the JavaDoc for more information:

As long as the length of the character sequence contained in the string buffer does not exceed the capacity, it is not necessary to allocate a new internal buffer array. If the internal buffer overflows, it is automatically made larger.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Internally StringBuffer uses a char array in order to store characters. Capacity is the initial size of that char array.

More INFO can be found from http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/StringBuffer.html

share|improve this answer
add comment

From http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/StringBuffer.html#capacity%28%29

public int capacity()

Returns the current capacity. The capacity is the amount of storage available for newly inserted characters, beyond which an allocation will occur.

Also from the same document

As of release JDK 5, this class has been supplemented with an equivalent class designed for use by a single thread, StringBuilder. The StringBuilder class should generally be used in preference to this one, as it supports all of the same operations but it is faster, as it performs no synchronization.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Yes, it's exactly that. You can think of StringBuffer as being a bit like a Vector<char> in that respect (except obviously you can't use char as a type argument in Java...)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Every string buffer has a capacity. As long as the length of the character sequence contained in the string buffer does not exceed the capacity, it is not necessary to allocate a new internal buffer array. If the internal buffer overflows, it is automatically made larger.

From: http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.4.2/docs/api/java/lang/StringBuffer.html

share|improve this answer
add comment

StringBuffer has a char[] in which it keeps the strings that you append to it. The amount of memory currently allocated to that buffer is the capacity. The amount currently used is the length.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It's the size of internal buffer. As Javadoc says:

Every string buffer has a capacity. As long as the length of the character sequence contained in the string buffer does not exceed the capacity, it is not necessary to allocate a new internal buffer array. If the internal buffer overflows, it is automatically made larger.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Taken from the official J2SE documentation

The capacity is the amount of storage available for newly inserted characters, beyond which an allocation will occur.

Its generally length+16, which is the minimum allocation, but once the number of character ie its size exceed the allocated one, StringBuffer also increases its size (by fixed amount), but by how much amount will be assigned,we can't calculate it.

share|improve this answer
add comment

"Every string buffer has a capacity. As long as the length of the character sequence contained in the string buffer does not exceed the capacity, it is not necessary to allocate a new internal buffer array. If the internal buffer overflows, it is automatically made larger."

http://download.oracle.com/javase/1.3/docs/api/java/lang/StringBuffer.html -see capacity() and ensurecapacity()

share|improve this answer
add comment

Ivan, just read the documentation for capacity() - it directly answers your question...

share|improve this answer
    
I already red it, and it says "capacity is the amount of storage" but I wasn't sure what is measure unit for this amount. As some approved this measure unit is "number of characters". Thanks. –  Иван Бишевац Nov 4 '11 at 15:33
    
Quote: Returns the current capacity. The capacity is the amount of storage available for newly inserted characters, beyond which an allocation will occur. –  DejanLekic Nov 4 '11 at 17:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.