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The Problem

I want to parse lines of a text box in order to generate items from it.

I've got it working but it looks ugly as sin.

How can I clean up that "if/else" mess?

Code

class LineParser
  def self.parse(line)
    line_matches = line.chomp.match(/(?<name>[[:print:]]+) \$(?<price>\d+\.*\d*)( +?(?<description_text>[^\+#]([[:print:]][^\+#])*))?( +?(\+(?<quantity>\d+)))?( +?#(?<cat1>[[:print:]][^#]*))?$/)
    return matches_to_hash(line_matches)
  end
  def self.matches_to_hash(matches)
    hash = {}
    keys = [:name, :price, :description_text, :quantity, :cat1]
    keys.each do |key|
      if key == :price
        hash[key] = matches[key].to_f
      elsif key == :quantity
        if matches[key].nil?
          hash[key] = 1
        else
          hash[key] = matches[key].to_i
        end
      else
        hash[key] = matches[key]
      end
    end
    hash
  end
end
share|improve this question
    
Thanks to everyone for all the great suggestions. I've learned so much just from one question! :) –  John Gallagher Nov 4 '11 at 18:03
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Removed explicit return from parse.

class LineParser
  def self.parse(line)
    line_matches = line.chomp.match(/(?<name>[[:print:]]+) \$(?<price>\d+\.*\d*)( +?(?<description_text>[^\+#]([[:print:]][^\+#])*))?( +?(\+(?<quantity>\d+)))?( +?#(?<cat1>[[:print:]][^#]*))?$/)
    matches_to_hash(line_matches)
  end
  def self.matches_to_hash(matches)
    {
      :price            => matches[:price].to_f,
      :quantity         => (matches[:quantity] || 1).to_i,
      :name             => matches[:name],
      :description_text => matches[:description_text],
      :cat1             => matches[:cat1]
    }
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Hot damn, that's lovely. I hated doing that whole hash = {} return hash thing and I knew must have been a better way. This is it! Thanks. –  John Gallagher Nov 4 '11 at 15:59
    
mmm ruby :) If you're in a situation where literals don't make sense, you can also use Object#tap. –  Joel Meador Nov 4 '11 at 16:06
    
P.S. hat tip to @Thilo –  Joel Meador Nov 4 '11 at 16:06
1  
the number of fields (5) it's in the edge. If I had 10 fields for example, I'd definitely go for a loop on the fields, but this is ok for 5. –  tokland Nov 4 '11 at 16:11
1  
You need to a commas when building the hash {:thing1 => 1, :thing2 => 2} –  drummondj Nov 4 '11 at 16:29
show 3 more comments

This

if matches[key].nil?
  hash[key] = 1
else
  hash[key] = matches[key].to_i
end

is equivalent to

hash[key] = (matches[key] || 1).to_i

And for if/else chains with more than a couple of branches, maybe a case statement is more appropriate.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't even think of that. Superb! Thanks. –  John Gallagher Nov 4 '11 at 15:51
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To tidy matches_to_hash I would do:

def self.matches_to_hash(matches)
  hash = {}
  hash[:name] = matches[:name]
  hash[:price] = matches[:price].to_f
  hash[:description_text] = matches[:description_text]
  hash[:quantity] = matches[:quantity].nil? ? 1 : matches[:quantity].to_i
  hash[:cat1] = matches[:cat1]
  hash
end

But, I think I would just change parse to:

def self.parse(line)
  line_matches = line.chomp.match(/([[:print:]]+) \$(\d+\.*\d*)( +?([^\+#]([[:print:]][^\+#])*))?( +?(\+(\d+)))?( +?#([[:print:]][^#]*))?$/)
  hash = {}
  hash[:name] = $1
  hash[:price] = $2.to_f
  hash[:description_text] = $3
  hash[:quantity] = $4.nil? ? 1 : $4.to_i
  hash[:cat1] = $5
  hash
end
share|improve this answer
    
why create the hash in PHP-style? –  tokland Nov 4 '11 at 15:50
    
Great point - I originally put the matches as named because it got me a hash like object, but if I need to manipulate it before I put it into the hash then there's not much point. –  John Gallagher Nov 4 '11 at 15:53
    
@tokland: what is PHP-style? –  drummondj Nov 4 '11 at 15:56
    
usual php-style: hash = {}; hash[:a] = 1. Other languages: hash = {:a => 1}. –  tokland Nov 4 '11 at 16:03
    
Ah OK. Ruby supports both ways, so I'm not that picky. Whatever works that looks readable. –  drummondj Nov 4 '11 at 16:07
add comment
class LineParser
  def self.parse(line)
    line_matches = line.chomp.match(/(?<name>[[:print:]]+) \$(?<price>\d+\.*\d*)( +?(?<description_text>[^\+#]([[:print:]][^\+#])*))?( +?(\+(?<quantity>\d+)))?( +?#(?<cat1>[[:print:]][^#]*))?$/)
    return matches_to_hash(line_matches)
  end
  def self.matches_to_hash(matches)
    hash = {}
    [:name, :price, :description_text, :quantity, :cat1].each do |key|
      case key
       when :price
         hash[key] = matches[key].to_f
       when :quantity
          hash[key] = 1 if matches[key].nil?
          hash[key] = matches[key].to_i unless matches[key].nil?
       else
         hash[key] = matches[key]
     end
     hash
  end
end
share|improve this answer
add comment

I'm not entirely certain why you're looping through the keys when each key does something different. Why not just handle them one by one?

class LineParser
  def self.parse(line)
    line_matches = line.chomp.match(/(?<name>[[:print:]]+) \$(?<price>\d+\.*\d*)( +?(?<description_text>[^\+#]([[:print:]][^\+#])*))?( +?(\+(?<quantity>\d+)))?( +?#(?<cat1>[[:print:]][^#]*))?$/)
    return matches_to_hash(line_matches)
  end
  def self.matches_to_hash(matches)
    hash = {}
    hash[:price] = matches[:price].to_f
    hash[:quantity] = (matches[:quantity] || 1).to_i
    hash[:name] = matches[:name]
    hash[:description_text] = matches[:description_text]
    hash[:cat1] = matches[:cat1]
    hash
  end
end

Note: I also stole the clever bit that Thilo posted about quantity.

share|improve this answer
    
that looks good, but no need to build the hash updating it. Simply build the hash in one step. –  tokland Nov 4 '11 at 15:49
    
Yeah, looking back I'm not sure why either. I guess I thought it would reduce duplication and make the code simpler. Man, was I wrong! Thanks for your excellent suggestion. –  John Gallagher Nov 4 '11 at 16:02
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