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For example, assume the following code:

foreach(Car car in Cars)
{
    if(car.Damaged)
       LogWarning();
    else
       LogInfo();
}

Is it better to do:

foreach(Car car in Cars)
{
    if(car.Damaged)
    {
       LogWarning();
       continue;
    }

       LogInfo();
}
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My bet is that 2 weeks after writing the abomination that is your second example (which I am not even sure is correct), you will not understand what it does. Write code to be read, and optimize later when you figure out what is really slow. –  drdwilcox Nov 4 '11 at 15:48
3  
Missing some braces there. Currently, LogInfo() never called in the second example. –  Marc Nov 4 '11 at 15:49
    
@drdwilcox - In case you curious, I did not write this. It is pseudo--code, but I do have similar code in the first example, but Refactor Pro! is saying I can flatten it. That is why I asked. No need to be rude. –  Xaisoft Nov 4 '11 at 15:50
    
@Marc - LogInfo should not be called. If there is a warning, it should just continue to the next car and not log info. I added the missing braces. –  Xaisoft Nov 4 '11 at 15:52
1  
Sorry, not trying to be rude. There is a tendency to make two mistakes when learning to develop software: early optimization and clever expressions. Learning to avoid these common mistakes is an important part of one's education, but not one typically taught in school. So I help by teaching it here whenever possible. –  drdwilcox Nov 4 '11 at 15:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Is there a performance benefit with flattening conditionals?

Maybe, but it's almost surely irrelevant. Instead, what you end up with is code that is more difficult to understand and maintain in exchange for an almost-surely irrelevant performance difference.

If you really want to know, write the code both ways and profile it properly. But again, the performance difference is unlikely to be meaningful, and you end up with harder-to-read code. Why?

Book publishers could make books lightweight so easier to carry and with a smaller burden on the environment by publishing in one-point font with no page margins. Why don't they?

Code is not just for the compiler. It's for the human too, and the human has to be able to read it and maintain it.

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With a good compiler. It will produce the same thing. So you want to know if the compiler is good or not. The best way is to look at compiled code and to launch performance analysis if two different things are produced.

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