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I was recently asked to rewrite a class that used inheritance, to a class that used composition instead. I ran into a problem when I was rewriting the toString() method; the method toString() would not return the string value, and I did not receive a runtime error or a compilation error. I ended up changing the return value to void and the method name to output. so rather than returning the string value I used system.out

my attempt to use toString

public String toString()
{
    return String.format(
    "%s: %s %s\n%s: %s\n%s: %.2f\n%s: %.2f\n%s: %.2f\n%s: %.2f",
    "based-salaried commission employee", cEmp.getFirstName(), cEmp.getLastName(),
    "social security number", cEmp.getSocialSecurityNumber(),
    "gross sales", cEmp.getGrossSales(),
    "commission rate", cEmp.getCommissionRate(),
    "base salary",baseSalary,
    "earnings", earnings());
}

what I settled with

public void outPut()
{
    System.out.printf(
    "%s: %s %s\n%s: %s\n%s: %.2f\n%s: %.2f\n%s: %.2f\n%s: %.2f",
    "based-salaried commission employee", cEmp.getFirstName(), cEmp.getLastName(),
    "social security number", cEmp.getSocialSecurityNumber(),
    "gross sales", cEmp.getGrossSales(),
    "commission rate", cEmp.getCommissionRate(),
    "base salary",baseSalary,
    "earnings", earnings());
}

My question is why aren't I receiving compilation or runtime error from javac when I use the toString() method, and why isn't it returning the string value if there isn't an error.

hope this isn't too strange of a question.

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>"the method toString() would not return the string value" What did it return instead? –  Boann Nov 4 '11 at 15:55
    
if the method signature was to return String it must have returned some String, otherwise there would be a compile-time issue. We need more information to answer the question. –  John B Nov 4 '11 at 15:57
    
You settled with that public void outPut() for public String toString()? Does not quite make sense. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 4 '11 at 16:01
    
I first created an Object of the class that contains the toString method, its name was base. in the main class I then called the method like so base.toString(); when I run the program, although it should return a string it does not, instead it runs the program with no output what so ever. –  smkelsey Nov 4 '11 at 16:18
3  
@smkelsey: You realize calling toString() only returns a string yes? It does not display it. Use System.out.println(base); –  Boann Nov 4 '11 at 16:24
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3 Answers

Object (the class from which all java objects ultimately inherit) defines it's own toString() method. Therefore, if you don't override the toString() method in your class, then it will use the one defined in Object() (or any intermediate classes between your class and Object).

This is why, if you don't define a toString() method, you don't get an error from javac.

This usually results in a String like

System.out.println("o=" + new Object().toString())
o=java.lang.Object@1176e5f
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I think what he meant was that when defining the toString() method, he didn't get any compile time errors, nor any runtime errors, but didn't get the expected results. –  Laf Nov 4 '11 at 16:07
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The first question (why there is no compilation error) is answered by Matthew. Regarding the second one:

As to my understanding instance methods are virtual in Java, that is in every case the actual object's method is called. Hence I'm wondering about the code which doesn't produce the expected result:)

Possible errors: There could be some trivial wiring error. Ie. mistaken use/test case: for instance a different object of different class is used/tested - different than the one you implemented. Or a compilation error: your code is not yet compiled, another (possible old) version is used when testing. Or something similar "trivial" problem:) In other words:

If your code is compiled/deployed/ran and the object instance tested/used belongs to your class than it should run your logic.

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I was calling the toString() method incorrectly. I was under the impression that by returning a String value it would have been printed so I used base.toString(); Instead of system.out.print(base); I feel pretty foolish. Thanks for the help. –  smkelsey Nov 4 '11 at 16:38
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You need to add @Override above the function.

@Override
public String toString()
{
    return String.format(
    "%s: %s %s\n%s: %s\n%s: %.2f\n%s: %.2f\n%s: %.2f\n%s: %.2f",
    "based-salaried commission employee", cEmp.getFirstName(), cEmp.getLastName(),
    "social security number", cEmp.getSocialSecurityNumber(),
    "gross sales", cEmp.getGrossSales(),
    "commission rate", cEmp.getCommissionRate(),
    "base salary",baseSalary,
    "earnings", earnings());
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Override is not required. It's just for your safety. –  Bhesh Gurung Nov 4 '11 at 15:55
    
@Override is only a hint for the developer. It does not affect whether the method is actually overridden or not. –  Boann Nov 4 '11 at 15:56
    
@Override does not affect run-time behavior and not including it has no effect –  John B Nov 4 '11 at 15:58
    
I will just ask my teacher next time I see him. Override had no effect as you said. –  smkelsey Nov 4 '11 at 16:24
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