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CREATE TABLE titlexplan(
  id INTEGER NOT NULL,
  title_id INTEGER NOT NULL ,
  plan_id INTEGER NOT NULL ,
  start_date DATETIME NOT NULL,
  end_date DATETIME
  CHECK (start_date < end_date),
  PRIMARY KEY(id),
  INDEX (title_id),
    FOREIGN KEY (title_id)
    REFERENCES title(id)
  INDEX (plan_id),
    FOREIGN KEY (plan_id)
    REFERENCES plan(id)    
);

This is the code I am using, and I am getting a syntax error: #1064 - You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'INDEX (plan_id), FOREIGN KEY (plan_id) REFERENCES plan(id) )' at line 10.

I am trying to get the title_id and plan_id to update when the respective id's from other tables update, and I'm trying to track changes.

I haven't been able to find a clear guide for how to do this, and these queries work in part but not in whole. I don't think that I need a primary key in this table, but I get a warning: "Warning, table contains no primary key," when I don't use primary keys. So, I just added the 'id' column. I'm not thinking it's actually needed, though.

Please advise.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
The error you get is because of a mssing comma: REFERENCES title(id) , – ypercubeᵀᴹ Nov 5 '11 at 8:58
up vote 1 down vote accepted
CREATE TABLE titlexplan(
  id INTEGER NOT NULL,
  title_id INTEGER NOT NULL ,
  plan_id INTEGER NOT NULL ,
  start_date DATETIME NOT NULL,
  end_date DATETIME
  CHECK (start_date < end_date),
  PRIMARY KEY(id),

  FOREIGN KEY (title_id)
  REFERENCES title(id)
  ON UPDATE CASCADE,

  FOREIGN KEY (plan_id)
  REFERENCES plan(id)
  ON UPDATE CASCADE
);

I beleive this should work. "ON UPDATE CASCADE" will cause these foreign keys to update any time the key they are referencing updates.

Also make sure your using innoDB engine for the foreign keys to work properly.

If you didn't want the id column and the combination of title_id and plan_id was always unique you could do

CREATE TABLE titlexplan(
  title_id INTEGER NOT NULL ,
  plan_id INTEGER NOT NULL ,
  start_date DATETIME NOT NULL,
  end_date DATETIME
  CHECK (start_date < end_date),
  PRIMARY KEY(title_id, plan_id),

  FOREIGN KEY (title_id)
  REFERENCES title(id)
  ON UPDATE CASCADE,

  FOREIGN KEY (plan_id)
  REFERENCES plan(id)
  ON UPDATE CASCADE   
);
share|improve this answer
    
Why did you make them both primary id's in the second example, Clay? – Wolfpack'08 Nov 5 '11 at 5:15
    
Also, I can confirm this works. – Wolfpack'08 Nov 5 '11 at 10:50
1  
I did that so that you wouldn't have to create an extra column 'ID' to be the primary key. Instead you could have the primary key be represented by the combination if title_id and plan_id as long as that combination will always be uniqe – Clay Goddard Nov 7 '11 at 1:42
    
That's very interesting. I didn't know SQL could do that. Thanks for the cool tip, Clay. – Wolfpack'08 Nov 9 '11 at 2:46

You get that error because of a missing comma:

...  
  INDEX (title_id),
    FOREIGN KEY (title_id)
    REFERENCES title(id)  ,        ---  <---- missing comma here
  INDEX (plan_id),
    FOREIGN KEY (plan_id)
    REFERENCES plan(id) 
);

Another thing is the CHECK constraint you have:

CHECK (start_date < end_date),

This will NOT produce any error but the SQL engine will not be checking for that constraint. As the MySQL docs explain in CREATE TABLE, CHECK constraints:

The CHECK clause is parsed but ignored by all storage engines.

share|improve this answer

Clay showed you how to do the cascade, so let me just add this:

It is often a good idea to create an index on a foreign key. If you're doing a cascade, you really should.

I don't think there's any way in standard SQL to create an index as part of a CREATE TABLE. (MYSQL might have an extension to do this -- I admit I didn't check.) So you should just create the index separately.

create index idx_titlexplan_title on titlexplan (title_id);
create index idx_titlexplan_plan on titlexplan (plan_id);
share|improve this answer
    
thank you. may I ask why it's a good idea? – Wolfpack'08 Nov 5 '11 at 4:26
    
Also, what kind of naming convention is that? idx_titlexplain_title seems like a very awkward name for an index. heh – Wolfpack'08 Nov 5 '11 at 4:29
    
I noticed that it doesn't work if I don't write it that way, though. I see how you did it. – Wolfpack'08 Nov 5 '11 at 10:41
    
It's a good idea to index on foreign keys most of the time because you often want to retrieve all records with a given foreign key. An index makes this efficient. In this case, will you routinely want to find all Titlexplan records with a given Planid? If so, an index on this field will help. If you have a cascade, then anytime the id changes or the associated record is deleted, the db has to find all the records with the given planid. So an index helps. (continued ...) – Jay Nov 6 '11 at 21:33
    
(continued) Sometimes, of course, this isn't true. Maybe you always or almost always get the Titlexplan record first, and go from there to the Plan record, and never go from a Plan to a Titlexplan. In that case an index on the foreign key would be superfluous. – Jay Nov 6 '11 at 21:33

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