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I'm about to hit the screen with my keyboard as I couldn't convert a char to a string, or simply adding a char to a string.

I have an char array and I want to pick whichever chars I choose in the array to create a string. How do I do that?

string test = "oh my F**king GOD!"
const char* charArray = test.c_str();

string myWord = charArray[0] + charArray[4];

thats how far I got with it. Please help.

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1  
Or you could do string myWord; myWord += charArray[0]; myWord += charArray[4]; Cat PlusPlus's way is better, I'm just saying that you can use concatenation for that too. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 4 '11 at 16:46

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

no need to convert to c_str just:

string test = "oh my F**king GOD!";
string myWord;
myWord += test[0];
myWord += test[4];
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string myWord;
myWord.push_back(test[0]);
myWord.push_back(test[4]);

You don't need to use c_str() here.

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There is also basic_string& operator=(charT c). I think I would use that. Like, myWord += test[0]. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 4 '11 at 16:56
    
@Alf: Missed a + in the function declaration? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 5 '11 at 2:07
    
@Tomalak: yes, thanks. readers can just insert it. ;-) –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Nov 5 '11 at 2:14
    
@Alf: Wasn't sure :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 5 '11 at 2:27

Are you restricted in some way to use C++ functions only? Because, for this purpose I use the old C functions like sprintf

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1  
To all passers-by: Please take the direct opposite of this advice! Quite conversely, you should [generally] use C functions only when you are restricted to them for some legacy reason. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 5 '11 at 2:07

You need to also need to remember that a C++ string is quite similar to a vector, while a C string is just array of chars. Vectors have an operator[] and a push_back method. Read more here You use push_back and do not convert to c string. So your code would look like this:

string test = "oh my F**king GOD!"
string myWord;
myWord.push_back(test[0]);
myWord.push_back(test[4]);
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A C++ string is not a vector. A vector is a vector; a string is a string. And it's operator[]. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 5 '11 at 2:07
    
@TomalakGeret'kal better? –  Joe Tyman Nov 5 '11 at 2:08
    
Yes, much better! :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 5 '11 at 2:09

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