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The question is confusing, but thats what i want to do:

public class Main
{
    MyClass instance = new MyClass();
    Thread secondThread = new Thread(instance);

    public static void main()
    {
         secondThread.start();
         //here i want to call foo(), but be processed by secondThread thread(not the Main thread)
    }
}


public class MyClass implements Runnable
{
    @Override
    public void run()
    {

    }

    public void foo()
    {
        System.out.println("foo");
    }
}

If i use "instance.foo();" it will be processed by the Main thread.

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1  
Yes, I'm already running from it.. –  Martin James Nov 4 '11 at 16:42

4 Answers 4

The idea of a Runnable is that it's a consolidated piece of code that can be executed by something else inside of whatever context it chooses (in this case, a thread). The second thread will call the run() method when it starts, so you may want to have a call to foo() within your MyClass.run() method. You cannot arbitrarily decide, from the main thread, that the second thread is now going to abandon whatever it was doing in the run() method and start working on foo().

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"You cannot arbitrarily decide, from the main thread, that the second thread is now going to abandon whatever it was doing in the run() method and start working on foo()." I don't know what you mean when you say, "you cannot arbitrarily decide", but it is possible to run foo from the main method while some runnable object infinite loops in its run() method. So, what's happening when the main method calls 'run()'? Is it simply run from the main process's thread? –  Dale Markowitz Dec 22 at 20:45

You cannot call a thread, you can only signal it. If you want foo() to be executed, you have to signal run() to ask it to execute foo().

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In case foo() returns, for example, a reference to another object, and I call it the way it's done in the example, what would be the value returned by foo()? –  Patrizio Rullo Dec 18 '13 at 13:39

I'd modify your class to contain an Executor, and then have it's methods ask the executor to run the task. By passing the executor into MyClass's constructor, main controls how the tasks get executed.

public class Main
{
   Executor runner = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
   MyClass instance = new MyClass(runner);

   public static void main()
   {
        instance.foo();
        // cleanup executor
   }
}


public class MyClass
{
   private final Executor runner;

   public MyClass(Executor runner)
   {
      this.runner = runner;
   }

   public void foo()
   {
       runner.execute(new Runnable() {
          public void run() {
             System.out.println("foo");
          }
       });
   }
}
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change your code as below:

public class Main
{
    Object signal = new Object();
    MyClass instance = new MyClass();
    Thread secondThread = new Thread(instance);

    public static void main()
    {
         instance.setSignal(signal);
         secondThread.start();
          synchronize(signal)
          { 
         try{
          signal.notify();**//here will notify the secondThread to invoke the foo()**
         }
         catch(InterrupedException e)
         {
                e.printStackTrace();
          }
    }
}


public class MyClass implements Runnable
{
    Object signal;
    public setSignal(Object sig)
    {
        signal = sig;
    }

    @Override
    public void run()
    {
       synchronize(signal)
       { 
         try{
          signal.wait();
         }
         catch(InterrupedException e)
         {
                e.printStackTrace();
          }
       }
        this.foo();

    }

    public void foo()
    {
        System.out.println("foo");
    }
}
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