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I have a file csv :

data1,data2,data2
data3,data4,data5
data6,data7,data8

I want to convert it to (Contained in a variable):

variable=data1,data2,data2%0D%0Adata3,data4,data5%0D%0Adata6,data7,data8

My attempt :

data=''
cat csv | while read line
do
data="${data}%0D%0A${line}"
done
echo $data  # Fails, since data remains empty (loop emulates a sub-shell and looses data)

Please help..

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7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In bash,

data=$(
while read line
do
  echo -n "%0D%0A${line}"
done < csv)

In non-bash shells, you can use `...` instead of $(...). Also, echo -n, which suppresses the newline, is unfortunately not completely portable, but again this will work in bash.

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Getting extra spaces : this,is,some,data%0D%0A this,is,again,data%0D%0A third,line,of,data%0D%0A fourth,line,in,data%0D%0A –  Yugal Jindle Nov 4 '11 at 17:33
    
Right... doh. Edited to add echo -n. –  Andrew Schulman Nov 4 '11 at 17:34
1  
FYI, $() is standard. Has been for years. If you want a portable echo -n use printf –  Sorpigal Nov 4 '11 at 17:51

Simpler to just strip newlines from the file:

tr '\n' '' < yourfile.txt > concatfile.txt
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This is not helping at all. –  Yugal Jindle Nov 4 '11 at 17:34
    
tr '\n' '' < csv prints out the value, like your original script did. If you didn't need it in a variable in bash – sounds like you do – you'd have been able to forego it entirely. –  noa Nov 4 '11 at 17:43

Some of these answers are incredibly complicated. How about this.

 data="$(xargs printf ',%s' < csv | cut -b 2-)"

or

 data="$(tr '\n' ',' < csv | cut -b 2-)"

Too "external utility" for you?

IFS=$'\n', read -d'\0' -a data < csv

Now you have an array! Output it however you like, perhaps with

data="$(tr ' ' , <<<"${data[@]}")"

Still too "external utility?" Well fine,

data="$(printf "${data[0]}" ; printf ',%s' "${data[@]:1:${#data}}")"

Yes, printf can be a builtin. If it isn't but your echo is and it supports -n, use echo -n instead:

data="$(echo -n "${data[0]}" ; for d in "${data[@]:1:${#data[@]}}" ; do echo -n ,"$d" ; done)"

Okay, now I admit that I am getting a bit silly. Andrew's answer is perfectly correct.

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Another short bash solution

variable=$(
  RS=""
  while read line; do
    printf "%s%s" "$RS" "$line"
    RS='%0D%0A'
  done < filename
)
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awk 'END { print r }
{ r = r ? r OFS $0 : $0 }
  ' OFS='%0D%0A' infile  

With shell:

data=

while IFS= read -r; do
  [ -n "$data" ] &&
     data=$data%0D%0A$REPLY ||
    data=$REPLY
done < infile

printf '%s\n' "$data"   

Recent bash versions:

data=

while IFS= read -r; do
  [[ -n $data ]] &&
     data+=%0D%0A$REPLY ||
    data=$REPLY
done < infile

printf '%s\n' "$data"
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Useless use of cat, punished! You want to feed the CSV into the loop

while read line; do 
 # ...
done < csv
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Getting extra spaces : this,is,some,data%0D%0A this,is,again,data%0D%0A third,line,of,data%0D%0A fourth,line,in,data%0D%0A –  Yugal Jindle Nov 4 '11 at 17:33
    
Interesting, I don't. Are they in the source file or your shell expression maybe? –  themel Nov 4 '11 at 17:46

I would much prefer a loop:

for line in $(cat file.txt); do echo -n $line; done
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