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I am playing around with the new explicit for cast-operators. If you write something like

struct Data {
    explicit operator string(); 
};

It is not possible to accidentally convert Data to string. The darget data type bool is an exception: In certain cases the implicit conversion is allowed even if it is marked explicit -- contextual conversion. So, you can use this data types in an if(...) for example:

struct Ok {
    explicit operator bool(); // allowed in if(...) anyway
};

The paragraph "25.4.(2) Sorting and related operations" seems to allow this for the Compare functor of standard containers like set as well. But my tries with gcc-4.7.0 fail, and I am note sure if it is my mis-understanding or a bug in gcc?

#include <set>

struct YesNo { // Return value type of Comperator
    int val_;
    explicit YesNo(int y) : val_{y} {}
    /* explicit */ operator bool() { return val_!=0; }
};

static const YesNo yes{1};
static const YesNo no{0};

struct LessYesNo {  // Comperator with special return values
    YesNo operator()(int a, int b) const {
        return a<b ? yes : no;
    }
};

int main() {
    std::set<int,LessYesNo> data {2,3,4,1,2};
}

Without the explicit before operator bool() the example compiles. And my understanding of "25.4.(2)" is, that this should also compile with the `explicit.

Did I understand the Std correctly that for set also explicit bool conversions should work? And might this be a bug in gcc then, or did I understand something wrong?

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2  
I agree with your reading of the standard, FWIW. What error do you get from gcc? –  Alan Stokes Nov 4 '11 at 18:12
1  
I agree that it seems to be explained as such, so it may not yet be implemented in gcc (I am wary about speaking of bugs when the compilers are still being written). –  Matthieu M. Nov 4 '11 at 18:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

My reading of the standard is a little different - section 25.4 deals with sorting algorithms rather than for sorted containers; the context established in 25.4.(1) means that the property of the compare object specified in 25.4.(2) applies to the algorithms in 25.4, not to sorted containers

1 All the operations in 25.4 have two versions: one that takes a function object of type Compare and one that uses an operator.

2 Compare is a function object type (20.8). The return value of the function call operation applied to an object of type Compare, when contextually converted to bool (4), yields true if the first argument of the call is less than the second, and false otherwise. Compare comp is used throughout for algorithms assuming an ordering relation. It is assumed that comp will not apply any non-constant function through the dereferenced iterator.

I don't know whether your example should work or not, but I don't think section 25.4 is applicable here.

A quick test with a vector and std::sort works:

#include <list>
#include <algorithm>

struct YesNo { // Return value type of Comperator
    int val_;
    explicit YesNo(int y) : val_{y} {}
    explicit operator bool() { return val_!=0; }
};

static const YesNo yes{1};
static const YesNo no{0};

struct LessYesNo {  // Comperator with special return values
    YesNo operator()(int a, int b) const {
        return a<b ? yes : no;
    }
};

int main() {
    std::vector<int> data {2,3,4,1,2};
    std::sort(std::begin(data), std::end(data), LessYesNo());
}

Edit:

The associative container's Compare parameter is defined in terms of secion 25.4:

1 Associative containers provide fast retrieval of data based on keys. The library provides four basic kinds of associative containers: set, multiset, map and multimap.

2 Each associative container is parameterized on Key and an ordering relation Compare that induces a strict weak ordering (25.4) on elements of Key. In addition, map and multimap associate an arbitrary type T with the Key. The object of type Compare is called the comparison object of a container.

and 23. has no other conditions on the type of Compare as far as I can see, so it does seem reasonable to assume that a type satisfying the constraints of 25.4 are equally applicable.

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Thanks for the example that works. I would hope that this would hold true for containers as well though, otherwise it may warrant a DR. –  Matthieu M. Nov 4 '11 at 19:34
    
Yeah, I'd hope so too - I'm having a look through section 23 at the moment to see what it has to say about the Compare arg there. Also ta for the up-vote, that was my first post on stackoverflow :) –  je4d Nov 4 '11 at 19:39
    
23.2.4/2: "Each associative container is parameterized on Key and an ordering relation Compare that induces a strict weak ordering (25.4) on elements of Key." –  Dennis Zickefoose Nov 4 '11 at 19:54
    
@je4d: Perfect! Now that you pointed it out I wonder how I could have mis-read it. I guess my brain was ahead of myself, using the implicit knowlege that sets and maps are kept sorted -- which is of course a different matter then sorting. Thanks. –  towi Nov 5 '11 at 13:14
    
@towi Ta for my first accept :) But note the edit at the bottom and Dennis Zickefoose's comment, it is implied in §23.2.4.(2) that the same constraints apply for Comparator types for sorted containers, so in light of that I'd consider this to be a bug in libstdc++v3. –  je4d Nov 5 '11 at 13:48

Did I understand the Std correctly that for set also explicit bool conversions should work?

This is sort of a grey area of the specification. The return value from the comparison function is required to be "convertible to bool". But what that means in light of explicit operator bool() is unclear.

For example, one could write std::set's comparison usage as this:

CompFunc functor;
if(functor(input, currVal))
  ...

Or, one could do this:

CompFunc functor;
bool test = functor(input, currVal);
if(test)
  ...

Are both of these technically legal under C++11? No idea. Obviously the second one fails if operator bool() is explicit.

I looked at the definition of std::shared_ptr, and it has an explicit operator bool() as well. It also says that std::shared_ptr is "convertible to bool", in section 20.7.2.2, paragraph 2.

So I'm guessing that the second version should be implemented as follows:

CompFunc functor;
bool test = static_cast<bool>(functor(input, currVal));
if(test)
  ...

The fact that it's not explicitly stated anywhere in the spec means that it should be filed as a defect report. But it should probably also be filed as a GCC/libstdc++ bug.

Personally, to be safe, I wouldn't rely on it.


On Contextual Conversion

Section 4, paragraph 3 states:

An expression e appearing in such a context is said to be contextually converted to bool and is well-formed if and only if the declaration bool t(e); is well-formed, for some invented temporary variable t

So operations which are "contextually convertible to bool" means that explicit operator bool() will work. Since std::set's "Compare" functor must fall under the requirements of 25.4, and these requirements include "contextually converted to bool", it looks like a GCC/libstdc++ bug.

I'd still avoid doing it when you can help it, though.

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Critical part of the quote "when contextually converted to bool (4)". I think that contextually in the Standard is specially meant to offset explicit conversion to bool. –  Matthieu M. Nov 4 '11 at 19:33
    
@MatthieuM.: See my addendum. –  Nicol Bolas Nov 4 '11 at 19:45
    
Do you thin that "std::shared_ptr is convertible to bool" refers to the "contextual conversion"? Or would shared_ptr<X> x ... ; bool b = (bool)x; also qualify for "convertible to bool"? –  towi Nov 5 '11 at 13:17

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