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How do I adjust the brightness of a color?
How do I determine darker or lighter color variant of a given color?
Programmatically Lighten a Color


Say I have

var c = Color.Red;

Now I want to create a new Color that is lighter or darker than that color. How can I do that without too much hassle?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 45 down vote accepted

ControlPaint.Light .Dark .DarkDark, etc.

Color lightRed = ControlPaint.Light( Color.Red );
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corrected your typo, although a ControlPain class would be funny :) –  schnaader Apr 29 '09 at 8:34
    
hehe...if you've every done any you know how true that is. –  Paul Alexander Apr 29 '09 at 8:39
1  
ControlPaint.Light and .Dark are perfect :D Especially with the extra percentage float parameter thingy. –  Svish Apr 29 '09 at 8:51
1  
Today, I realize that .Net framework is very huge size. Because I don't know about ControlPaint class before. But I use only 3-party image processing(like AForge.net). Thanks. –  Soul_Master Apr 29 '09 at 17:21

I recently blogged about this. The main idea is to apply a given correction factor to each of the color components. For example to make the color lighter you can use the following code:

float correctionFactor = 0.5f;
float red = (255 - color.R) * correctionFactor + color.R;
float green = (255 - color.G) * correctionFactor + color.G;
float blue = (255 - color.B) * correctionFactor + color.B;
Color lighterColor = Color.FromArgb(color.A, (int)red, (int)green, (int)blue);
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2  
Great answer. Better than ControlPaint.Dark or ControlPaint.Light. The ControlPaint methods do not work well with very small percentages, they have some built-in minimum. Your code works even with 0.1f. –  Jamrelian Nov 15 '12 at 15:30
    
@Pavel if I want to have n lighter shades of the same color , how would I use your algorithm? –  Geek Sep 10 '13 at 18:03
1  
@Geek, to produce n lighter shades of a given color simply execute the algorithm with different correction factors in the range (0, 1], for example 0.05, 0.10, 0.15, etc. –  Pavel Vladov Jan 2 at 13:50
    
Nice. I can use negative numbers for darks and positive for lights –  harveyt Jun 9 at 2:59
    
@harveyt, to get a darker color it's best to use a slightly modified formula. The full article on my blog gives a detailed explanation and code examples. –  Pavel Vladov Jun 13 at 6:09

Most of these methods do darken the color but they adjust the hue way to much so the result doesn't look very good. The best answer is to use Rich Newman's HSLColor class and adjust the luminosity.

public Color Darken(Color color, double darkenAmount) {
    HSLColor hslColor = new HSLColor(color);
    hslColor.Luminosity *= darkenAmount; // 0 to 1
    return hslColor;
}
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You can also do this using a Lerp function. There's one in XNA, but it's easy to write yourself.

See my answer to this similar question for a C# implementation.

The function lets you do this:

// make red 50% lighter:
Color.Red.Lerp( Color.White, 0.5 );

// make red 75% darker:
Color.Red.Lerp( Color.Black, 0.75 );

// make white 10% bluer:
Color.White.Lerp( Color.Blue, 0.1 );
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Here's some javascript code I use for lightening/darkening a given colour. You could use it as a base for an equivalent C# function

It works by calculating a distance from pure white of each of the RGB components and then adjusts this distance by the provided factor. The new distance is used to calculate the new colour. A factor of between 0 and 1 darkens, a factor higher than 1 lightens

function Darken( hexColor, factor )
    {   
        if ( factor < 0 ) factor = 0;

        var c = hexColor;
        if ( c.substr(0,1) == "#" )
        {
            c = c.substring(1);
        }

        if ( c.length == 3 || c.length == 6 )
        {
            var i = c.length / 3;

            var f;  // the relative distance from white

            var r = parseInt( c.substr(0, i ), 16 );
            f = ( factor * r / (256-r) );
            r = Math.floor((256 * f) / (f+1));

            r = r.toString(16);
            if ( r.length == 1 ) r = "0" + r;

            var g = parseInt( c.substr(i, i), 16);
            f = ( factor * g / (256-g) );
            g = Math.floor((256 * f) / (f+1));
            g = g.toString(16);
            if ( g.length == 1 ) g = "0" + g;

            var b = parseInt( c.substr( 2*i, i),16 );
            f = ( factor * b / (256-b) );
            b = Math.floor((256 * f) / (f+1));
            b = b.toString(16);
            if ( b.length == 1 ) b = "0" + b;

            c =  r+g+b;
         }   

         return "#" + c;

    }
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Take a look at the ControlPaint class:

MSDN: Members of ControlPaint

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Using HSI converter library(search google). And then, adjust I channel for lighter/darker color.

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