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I'm very new to web programming and jQuery. I want to load images and arrange them in a grid. However, the number of images to be loaded is not fixed. I have an array, img_arr, with the url and an id for each image.

The code that loads and positions images is like this:

var t = 0;
var l = 0;
for (i = 0; i < img_arr.length; i++) {
    var img = new Image();
    $(img)
        .attr('src', img_arr[i]['url'])
        .attr('id',  img_arr[i]['id'])
        .load(function(){
            $('#container').append( $(this) );
            // Your other custom code
            $(this).css( {
                "position": "absolute",
                     "top": t + 'px',
                    "left": l + 'px'
            });
        });
    l = l + 50;
    if (l > 300) {
        t = t + 50;
        l = 0;
    }
}

But, the images get placed on top of each other at the final offset location. Anyone know why this happens?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Mwahaha! [Evil laughter]

There's an error here, a common, insidious error, one that has nothing to do with images, or CSS, or jQuery. It's the late-binding error in Javascript.

The OP uses the variables t and l to mean "top" and "left" (incidentally, OP, what is wrong with top and left as variable names), incrementing them in a loop and invoking them at a callback. But t and l are late bound. When the onload functions are called, those variables are set to their final values, not the values they had when the image tag was created.

And so, "the images get placed on top of each other at the final offset location".

Try this:

var renderImage = function(imgdesc, t, l) {
   var img = new Image();
    $(img)
        .attr('src', imgdesc['url'])
        .attr('id',  imgdesc['id'])
        .load(function(){
            $('#container').append( $(this) );
            // Your other custom code
            $(this).css( {
                "position": "absolute",
                     "top": t + 'px',
                    "left": l + 'px'
            });
        });
};

var t = 0;
var l = 0;
for (i = 0; i < img_arr.length; i++) {
    renderImage(img_arr[i], t, l)
    l = l + 50;
    if (l > 300) {
        t = t + 50;
        l = 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for explaining what's going on – Rick Liddle Nov 4 '11 at 20:37
    
That makes much more sense now. Looks like I just got trapped in one of the biggest javascript bigfalls. Much thanks, Malvolio. – Alvin Nov 4 '11 at 21:47
    
@Alvin -- I've been writing Javascript for 15 years and I still do this about once a month. Of course, I might just be stupid. – Malvolio Nov 12 '11 at 1:25

If you don't NEED to position them absolutely, you could use a flow layout to accomplish this much more easily.

See this fiddle for an example. If you change the CSS for the width of #container you will see the number of images in each row change dynamically. I think this is a much cleaner approach. It takes all the math out and lets the browser handle laying things out.

share|improve this answer

Lots of little inefficiencies in your code. For one use your jQuery, no need to do new Image() when you can just do $('<img />'). Also, probably at some point someone will want to change the number of images across, or the height of the images, give yourself an out there. Also, you can set multiple tag attributes at once using .attr({ ... }), and remember that jQuery comes with the very nice .each() method for dealing with regular arrays.

So here's my solution:

var numberAcross = 6,
    widthOfImages = heightOfImages = 50;

$.each(img_arr, function(idx, value){
    $('<img />').attr({
        'src': value.url,
        'id': value.id,
        'width': widthOfImages,
        'height': heightOfImages
    }).css({
        'position': 'absolute',
        'top':  Math.floor(idx  / numberAcross) * heightOfImages,
        'left': (idx * widthOfImages) % (numberAcross * widthOfImages)
    }).appendTo('#container');
});

Also, you might want to add css to your #container element so you can see a bit better while developing:

<style>
#container {
    width: 100%;
    height: 600px;
    background-color: #ccc;
    position: relative;
}
</style>

Note that the position: relative in there means that wherever you put that "container" your absolutely positioned items will appear correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the tips artlung. Very helpful. – Alvin Nov 4 '11 at 21:46
    
Great! Please vote up any answers that were helpful to you, and when you're satisfied, choose an answer as "best answer" by marking the checkmark. – artlung Nov 4 '11 at 21:58
1  
"Lots of little inefficiencies in your code." As Knuth says, "We should forget about small efficiencies, say about 97% of the time." In particular, the new Image() / $(<img>) is just a completely random preference. – Malvolio Nov 4 '11 at 22:27
    
Sure. var img = new Image();$(img) vs $('<img/>'). Is calling the former an inefficiency overstating the case? Maybe. But it feels crufty to me. We're creating a variable we don't need, when we can do it all using a single call to the jQuery API. I know which one I prefer, but I will acknowledge the Perl motto TMTOWTDI. – artlung Nov 4 '11 at 22:46

Not sure why they wouldn't fold properly actually. I'm pretty sure there are some nifty css-tricks you could use to set those positions in a css-file, but let's work with your sample.

Could it be that the container isn't tall enough to contain the additional rows and thusly just place it at the end?

As for your sample, I'd place the math inline, and for 6 images pr row simply do the following instead of using all those counting variables:

$(this).css( {
    "position": "absolute",
    "top": Math.floor(i / 6) * 50 + 'px',
    "left": (i % 6) * 50 + 'px'
});

It probably won't solve your problem, but it looks cleaner to my eye.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that the css() method doesn't need to have 'px' added to the values passed into properties that take a number. Pixels are the default. – artlung Nov 4 '11 at 21:32
    
Fair point artlung. I didn't think about them though, tbh, as my snippet is just a copy-paste with the int-calculations replaced. What a pitty I didn't notice the late binding stuff... – Mithon Nov 4 '11 at 22:43

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