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Can anyone tell me how to do runtime debugging on shared libraries?

I need to runtime-debug a function in my shared library, but its called by another program. How can I do something like dbx with shared libraries?

I m using dbx on AIX. is gdb better than dbx for what I m trying to do?.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

You just need to call gdb with the executable (it does not matter if it is yours or a 3rd party one). Here is an example where I debug the ls command and set a breakpoint in the (shared) c library. This example uses gdb 6.8 which supports deferred (pending) breakpoints which makes this easy:

gdb /bin/ls
GNU gdb 6.8-debian
Copyright (C) 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.  Type "show copying"
and "show warranty" for details.
This GDB was configured as "x86_64-linux-gnu"...
(no debugging symbols found)
(gdb) b write
Function "write" not defined.
Make breakpoint pending on future shared library load? (y or [n]) y
Breakpoint 1 (write) pending.
(gdb) r
Starting program: /bin/ls
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
[Thread debugging using libthread_db enabled]
(no debugging symbols found)
(no debugging symbols found)
[New Thread 0x7f98d2d23780 (LWP 7029)]
[Switching to Thread 0x7f98d2d23780 (LWP 7029)]

Breakpoint 1, 0x00007f98d2264bb0 in write () from /lib/libc.so.6
(gdb)

As you can see dgb automatically manages all threads used by the executable. You don't have to do anything special for threads there. The breakpoint will work in any thread.

Alternatively if you want to attach the debugger to an already running application (I use tail -f /tmp/ttt here as an example):

ps ux | grep tail
lothar    8496  0.0  0.0   9352   804 pts/3    S+   12:38   0:00 tail -f /tmp/ttt
lothar    8510  0.0  0.0   5164   840 pts/4    S+   12:39   0:00 grep tail

gdb
GNU gdb 6.8-debian
Copyright (C) 2008 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.  Type "show copying"
and "show warranty" for details.
This GDB was configured as "x86_64-linux-gnu"...
(no debugging symbols found)
(gdb) attach 8496
Attaching to program: /usr/bin/tail, process 8496
Reading symbols from /lib/librt.so.1...(no debugging symbols found)...done.
Loaded symbols for /lib/librt.so.1
Reading symbols from /lib/libc.so.6...(no debugging symbols found)...done.
Loaded symbols for /lib/libc.so.6
Reading symbols from /lib/libpthread.so.0...(no debugging symbols found)...done.
[Thread debugging using libthread_db enabled]
[New Thread 0x7f24853f56e0 (LWP 8496)]
Loaded symbols for /lib/libpthread.so.0
Reading symbols from /lib/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2...
(no debugging symbols found)...done.
Loaded symbols for /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2
(no debugging symbols found)
0x00007f2484d2bb50 in nanosleep () from /lib/libc.so.6
(gdb) b write
Breakpoint 1 at 0x7f2484d57bb0
(gdb) c
Continuing.
[Switching to Thread 0x7f24853f56e0 (LWP 8496)]

Breakpoint 1, 0x00007f2484d57bb0 in write () from /lib/libc.so.6
(gdb)
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I used dbx on AIX. if u say gdb can do it with threaded applications ..then dbx sucks big time..and i have been a total fool for using it all this time. –  debugger Jun 1 '09 at 8:50
    
Sad gdb doesn't work properly on AIX... AIX sucks.. –  debugger Jun 1 '09 at 12:49
    
I don't know dbx, but it should have similar features –  lothar Jun 1 '09 at 14:54
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Normally the procedure for debugging a shared library is much the same as for debugging an executable - the main difference is that you may be unable to set a breakpoint until the shared library is loaded into memory. You attach the debugger to the main executable.

If you are debugging an application that is not owned by you, but is using your module in a plugin architecture, you still use the same method. Make sure (as always) that you have debugging information available for your shared library. In windows, you would generate a .pdb file. With gcc, I think you specify a special compiler flag (-g?) to ensure that debugging information is supplied. You attach the debugger to the third party application.

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what if the main executable is not mine and its some 3rd party's.... but i m writing a module that will be used by the 3rd party... How do u debug then? –  debugger May 26 '09 at 9:56
    
You still start the executable (or attach to a process) with gdb. After your library is loaded gdb can set breakpoints there without problem. –  lothar May 26 '09 at 20:28
    
But when you set a break point in your shared lib code and if the main executable call it , wont the main executable be blocked?? –  debugger May 27 '09 at 5:52
    
It will work in exactly the same way as any other breakpoint you would set in the main executable –  1800 INFORMATION May 27 '09 at 8:02
    
Well, what if u have threads in main executable..how would i go about debugging my shared library code in that case... its not that simple.. i tried setting break point to my functions..but the never stopped.. i cud even see my symbols... and i had logs confirm that my shared lib code is executing.. –  debugger May 28 '09 at 12:24
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I remember testing shared libraries by creating a mock app that used it. If you are willing to do a lot of work, you could create a second, mock shared library that just collects information about how the library is being used by the third party app, and then have your mock app replay that information.

Of course, never doubt the power of well placed printf and fprintf calls.

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You could try compiling and linking the library statically to debug it.
If your bug only shows up when it's compiled as shared, than that might give you some clues.

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