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I have a structure as

<div id ="page" class="item-page">
<table id="schedule">
</table>
</div>

How would i put in the styling information for #schedule

Would it be something like

#page .item-page #schedule{
 // css goes here
}
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6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Close! It would be #page.item-page #schedule { ... }.

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#page.item-page #schedule{
 // css goes here
}

or just

#schedule{
 // css goes here
}
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Since you are using id and id must be unique per page, you can directly use that instead:

#schedule{
 // css goes here
}
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Seeing at some websites, I would say that they should be unique :) –  Aurelio De Rosa Nov 4 '11 at 19:30
    
@Sarfraz: You say: id is unique per element per page. But shouldn't id be unique on page period? –  PeeHaa Nov 4 '11 at 19:32
    
@PeeHaa: Only if one co-incidently uses same id name on different pages. In that case one would go with #page #schedule, however it is always a good idea to have unique names. –  Sarfraz Nov 4 '11 at 19:34
    
@Sarfraz: ??? The question is is it valid to have twe elements on a page with the same id –  PeeHaa Nov 4 '11 at 19:39
    
@PeeHaa: It is invalid markup to have two elements with same id. See id stands for identifier which must be unique. Think of it identity card :) –  Sarfraz Nov 4 '11 at 19:40

Just #page #schedule would work fine.

In your code, #page and .item-page are the same element, so if you were to use both in your selector you would have to tie them together like this, #page.item-page rather than placing a space between them, which suggests the second is a child of the first.

So while #page #schedule represents this:

<div id="page" class="item-page">
  <table id="schedule"></table>
</div>

#page .item-page #schedule actually represents this:

<div id="page">
  <div class="item-page">
    <table id="schedule"></table>
  </div>
</div>

Assuming you're not using ids over and over (you shouldn't be), you could just refer to your table without a nested selector:

#schedule {
  border-collapse: collapse;
}
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You can do this in a few ways:

Simply:

#schedule {
}

ID Selector
#page #schedule {
}

div#page table#schedule {
}


Class Selector
.item-page #schedule {
}


div.item-page #schedule {
}


Both
div#page.item-selector table#schedule {
}
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You should read up on specificity. and inheritance In short, there is no reason to do be that specific.

CSS parses your rules from right to left, so here is what is going on at the browser level.

#schedule -> Browser says "Ok, anything with the ID "schedule", oh that's this table. Got it."

.item-page #schedule Browser says "Umm... got it, this table, when it exists inside anything with the class "item-page" that's... still just this browser.

#page .item-page #schedule Um.. so anything with the id "schedule" that's inside "item-page" that's inside "#page"... Wait! That doesn't exist!

#schedule{
    //css
}

would be more than sufficient.

If you want an example of inheritance:

.item-page table{}

will affect any table inside of .item-page

.item-page>table{}

will affect any table that is a DIRECT child of .item-page

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