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I am trying to test an example of search() from Stroustup's book.

string quote("why waste time learning, when ignorance is instantaneous?");

bool in_quote(const string& s){
    char* p = search(quote.begin(), quote.end(), s.begin(), s.end());
    return p != quote.end();
}

void test(){
    bool b1 = in_quote("learning"); // b1=true
    bool b2 = in_quote("lemming"); // b2=false
}

But I get the following error:

error C2440: 'initializing' : cannot convert from
'std::_String_iterator<_Elem,_Traits,_Alloc>' to 'char *'

It looks like the return type is not right. I also tried string::iterator, and got the same error. So, what should be the right type, is it supposed to be the iterator type of the container? Thanks

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If you have C++11, use auto. But it looks like it should be std::string::iterator. What's the message when you try that one? It should be a different message. –  Mooing Duck Nov 4 '11 at 19:35
    
@ubbdd Iterator is not a pointer. –  Mahesh Nov 4 '11 at 19:39
    
Open the "Output" window to see the full messages by the way. It should be telling you the type of _Elem there –  Mooing Duck Nov 4 '11 at 19:39

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I tried the following

bool in_quote(const string& s){
  string::iterator p = search(quote.begin(), quote.end(), s.begin(), s.end());
  return p != quote.end();
} 

And it did compile without error ...

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I just found I corrected a typo when copying the code. string::iterator should work. Thanks. –  ubbdd Nov 4 '11 at 19:52

How about simply not caring about the return type? :)

bool in_quote(const string& s){
    return search(quote.begin(), quote.end(), s.begin(), s.end()) != quote.end();
}
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Good pragmatic answer, but the question is more about why the code sample from the definitive reference book does not work. –  Mark Ransom Nov 4 '11 at 19:55
    
@Mark: Page number? –  FredOverflow Nov 4 '11 at 19:59
    
It's quite possible that the error was corrected in later editions. I don't have the book, but Google has it: books.google.com/… –  Mark Ransom Nov 4 '11 at 20:04
    
@Mark: It appears to be from the link :) –  FredOverflow Nov 4 '11 at 20:08

You have a const string, so it must be a const_iterator:

string::const_iterator p = search(quote.begin(), quote.end(), s.begin(), s.end());
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I don't think so: The return type of search is the same as the first two arguments (it's an itereator into quote after all). And quote is not const ... –  MartinStettner Nov 4 '11 at 19:39
1  
What are the actual rules? The search string is const but the string being searched is not. –  Mark Ransom Nov 4 '11 at 19:40
1  
@MartinStettner: seems you're right. But I have good reasons to assume the code given in question is not the exact code that didn't work. –  ybungalobill Nov 4 '11 at 19:40
1  
@MarkRansom You get an iterator into the string being searched (the position, where the search string is found...). Since the string being searched is non-const, the return value is a non-const iterator too ... –  MartinStettner Nov 4 '11 at 19:47
    
@MartinStettner, that makes total sense, and agrees with the Microsoft documentation once I looked it up. I hadn't seen your comment before I posted mine, mine was directed at ybungalobill. –  Mark Ransom Nov 4 '11 at 19:53

Early implementations of string could easily have used char* as their iterator type, allowing this incorrect code snippet to compile properly. Most modern implementations of string::iterator have a proper class type and would not be convertible to char*.

The signature for std::search is:

template <class ForwardIterator1, class ForwardIterator2>
   ForwardIterator1 search ( ForwardIterator1 first1, ForwardIterator1 last1,
                             ForwardIterator2 first2, ForwardIterator2 last2 );

As you can see, the return type is the same as the type of the first two iterators passed to the function. In your case string::iterator should have worked, unless there is some part of the code you did not show us that made quote const in which case you could use string::const_iterator.

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Per SGI documentation, the form of search you are using has the signature:

template <class ForwardIterator1, class ForwardIterator2>
ForwardIterator1 search(ForwardIterator1 first1, ForwardIterator1 last1,
                        ForwardIterator2 first2, ForwardIterator2 last2);

Since your FowardIterator1 type is std::string::iterator, your return type must be std::string::iterator as well.

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