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I have some pretty crazy custom validation I'm working on. Basically, based on the selection of a dropdown, that will determine what values are validated against the target property.

For example, I have the following dropdown:

1 = Car
2 = Truck

On my custom validation, if the selection is car, then the value can't be more than 20. If the selection is truck, the value can't be more than 40.

So my attributes need to look something like this:

[ValueBelowIf("1", 20)]
[ValueBelowIf("2", 40)]
public int Value { get; set; }

Of course, to even get it to compile, I have to set this on my custom attribute:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property, AllowMultiple = true)]
public class ValueBelowIfAttribute : ValidationAttribute, IClientValidatable

However, it appears only the first attribute is being bound -- the second is ignored.

What am I doing wrong?

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your class name is spelled wrong. –  Jeremy Holovacs Nov 4 '11 at 20:18
1  
Thanks, it was just spelled wrong in my example (I obfuscated it by hand). –  Jerad Rose Nov 4 '11 at 20:29
    
Inheritance? The dropdown would be the discriminator field, and each derived class could have distinct validation attributes. –  jkoreska Nov 4 '11 at 23:59

3 Answers 3

You need to override the default implementation of TypeId. MVC's validator will only evaluate each unique attribute based on it's TypeId value.

Change your attribute implementation to the following, and it'll work:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property, AllowMultiple = true)]
public class ValueBelowIfAttribute : ValidationAttribute, IClientValidatable
{
  private object _typeId = new object();
  public override object TypeId
  {
    get { return this._typeId; }
  }
  // OTHER CODE
}

From what I gather, AllowMultiple, at least in the case of MVC, just tells the compiler that the attribute is valid appearing multiple times, but it is TypeId that controls how those attributes are evaluated at runtime.

This can be useful because you can statically (at compile time) allow the same attribute type to be applied multiple times, but at runtime ignore logically duplicated attributes. For example, in my example instead of returning a guaranteed-unique new object(), I could return a hashcode of the attribute parameters. In that case, if you did:

[ValueBelowIf("1", 20)]
[ValueBelowIf("2", 40)]
[ValueBelowIf("2", 40)]
public int Value { get; set; }

the second [ValueBelowIf("2", 40)] would not be evaluated.

Read more details where I came across the answer here: http://www.paraesthesia.com/archive/2010/03/02/the-importance-of-typeid-in-asp.net-mvc-dataannotations-validation-attributes.aspx

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You are trying to implement class-wide validation logic into property-validation technique. Dont do that! Use proper class-validation mechanism instead, for example implement IValidatableObject, or use FluentValidation

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1  
I'm doing this in order to be able to wire up unobtrusive client-side validation. Is there a way to accomplish this for class-wide validation? –  Jerad Rose Nov 7 '11 at 15:37
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since C# Attrbiutes are limited constants, I found the best way to accomplish this is to provide all values through the constructor as separate values. This is ugly, but the only way it can be done.

For example:

[AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property, AllowMultiple = true)]
public class ValueBelowIfAttribute : ValidationAttribute, IClientValidatable
{
    public string IfValue { get; set; }
    public int BelowValue { get; set; }
    public string IfValue2 { get; set; }
    public int BelowValue2 { get; set; }
    public string IfValue3 { get; set; }
    public int BelowValue3 { get; set; }

    public ValueBelowIfAttribute(string ifValue, int belowValue)
    {
        // do stuff
    }

    public ValueBelowIfAttribute(string ifValue, int belowValue, string ifValue2, int belowValue2)
    {
        // do stuff
    }

    public ValueBelowIfAttribute(string ifValue, int belowValue, string ifValue2, int belowValue2, string ifValue3, int belowValue3)
    {
        // do stuff
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't answer why, despite "AllowMultiple = true", the attribute is not applied multiple times to the member in your example. –  bojingo Feb 14 at 15:18

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