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I have created a method for reading a file in Java. The file in question contains a list of books with the following format: lastname|firstname|title. However, when I try to use the method I get an error message. My method is as follows:

private final static char END_SIGN = '|';

void readBookFile(String readFile) {
        try {
            FileReader textFileReader = new FileReader(readFile);
            BufferedReader textReader = new BufferedReader(textFileReader);

            int numberOfBooks = Integer.parseInt(textReader.readLine());

            for (int i = 0; i < numberOfBooks; i++) {
                String post = textReader.readLine();

                int index1 = post.indexOf(END_SIGN);
                int index2 = post.indexOf(END_SIGN, index1 + 1);

                String lastname = post.substring(0, index1);
                String firstname = post.substring(index1 + 1, index2);
                String title = post.substring(index2 + 1);

                Book book = new Book(lastname, firstname, title);

                addBook(book);
            }

            tekstReader.close();
        }
        catch (IOException exception) {
            System.out.print("Wrong file reading: " + exception);
            System.exit(1);
        }
    }

When I try to run this method I get the error message:

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NumberFormatException: For input string: "Twain|Mark|The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"
    at java.lang.NumberFormatException.forInputString(Unknown Source)
    at java.lang.Integer.parseInt(Unknown Source)
    at java.lang.Integer.parseInt(Unknown Source)
    at Library.readBookFile(Library.java:36)
    at LibraryTest.main(LibraryTest.java:8)

Line 36 is the part of the method where I identify the integer numberOfBooks. So obviously this is not working for some reason. If anyone knows what could cause this, I would greatly appreciate it!

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1  
5 answers within 60 seconds. Wow. –  Alex B Nov 4 '11 at 20:25
    
Advice : never put any class in the default package. Always put your classes in a well-defined package (package com.yourcompany.yourproject.somepackage). –  JB Nizet Nov 4 '11 at 20:28
    
perhaps you would want to add the number of lines as its own line at the beginning? –  Brian Colvin Nov 4 '11 at 20:28
    
Yes I know that I can add the number of lines as a separate variable, but since different files may have different number of lines, it would be nice if I could somehow automatically get the method to read the number of lines for the for-loop. –  Kristian Nov 4 '11 at 20:32
    
I didn't know there is a book about my adventures. –  Huckleberry Finn Mar 31 '13 at 12:30

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Instead of this code:

int numberOfBooks = Integer.parseInt(textReader.readLine());

for (int i = 0; i < numberOfBooks; i++) {
    String post = textReader.readLine();

    int index1 = post.indexOf(END_SIGN);
    int index2 = post.indexOf(END_SIGN, index1 + 1);

    String lastname = post.substring(0, index1);
    String firstname = post.substring(index1 + 1, index2);
    String title = post.substring(index2 + 1);

    Book book = new Book(lastname, firstname, title);

    addBook(book);
}

Try this:

String post = textReader.readLine();
while (post != null) {
    int index1 = post.indexOf(END_SIGN);
    int index2 = post.indexOf(END_SIGN, index1 + 1);

    String lastname = post.substring(0, index1);
    String firstname = post.substring(index1 + 1, index2);
    String title = post.substring(index2 + 1);

    Book book = new Book(lastname, firstname, title);

    addBook(book);
    post = textReader.readLine();
}

Also, like Jon Skeet suggests, you should rearrange your code to ensure that the input is closed even if the processing of the input throws an exception. (A try ... finally construct is good for this.)

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beat me to it! solution instead of does not work is much more helpful++ –  Brian Colvin Nov 4 '11 at 20:34
    
Great! This worked! And thanks for the tip with the finally-construct. However, now I seem to be getting a different error message later in my code. Will try to fix it on my own though :). Thanks a lot! –  Kristian Nov 4 '11 at 20:36
int numberOfBooks = Integer.parseInt(textReader.readLine());

readLine() here returns the text of the first line of the text file. That first line appears to be Twain|Mark|The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and not a count of how many books are in the file.

What were you expecting the first line of the file to be?

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Thanks. You are right that the first line in the file is the Mark Twain book. I see that this obviously would lead to a mistake now. Do you by any chance know any tricks for how to get the method to read the number of lines in the txt.file? I would want to avoid just typing in the number of lines in the for-loop since different files might have a different number of lines. –  Kristian Nov 4 '11 at 20:29
    
@Kristian I'd look at another question: stackoverflow.com/questions/688431/… –  Alex B Nov 4 '11 at 20:34
    
Alex : Thanks for the link! Will look at it. Appreciate it greatly! –  Kristian Nov 4 '11 at 20:39

Clearly the first line of your file isn't a number - it's the line that's being shown in the error message. You need to check your file.

A few other notes though:

  • You should usually close your reader in a finally block
  • You should almost never use the platform default encoding, which is all that FileReader supports, making it a mostly useless type. Instead, create a FileInputStream and wrap it in an InputStreamReader, specifying the encoding.

Guava makes all of this easier with its Files class:

List<String> lines = Files.readLines(new File(readFile), Charsets.UTF_8);
// All the IO is now done...
share|improve this answer
    
The only down side with using Guava like this is that the entire file needs to reside in memory at once. A streaming approach that processes a single line at a time can be much more space efficient. –  Ted Hopp Nov 4 '11 at 20:34
    
@TedHopp True, in that case, Guava has T Files.readLines(File, Charset charset, LineProcessor<T>) :) –  Philipp Reichart Nov 4 '11 at 20:45

The line you're reading in isn't a number. It's the name of a book, so when it tries to read it as a number, it gives an error. When you look at your input file, are you sure it begins with the number of lines to follow?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I see that this obviously would lead to a mistake now. Do you by any chance know any tricks for how to get the method to read the number of lines in the txt.file? I would want to avoid just typing in the number of lines in the for-loop since different files might have a different number of lines. –  Kristian Nov 4 '11 at 20:28
    
As the other answers have probably made clear, if a file doesn't tell you the number of lines, it's easier to just use a while loop to read the file until you run out of lines rather than using a for loop which requires knowing how many lines there are. –  Keith Irwin Nov 4 '11 at 20:55
    
Yup. This was really great help! I am very grateful :) –  Kristian Nov 4 '11 at 21:04

The code assumes the file starts with an integer, the number of books, alone on the first line. Apparently this is not present in your data file.

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The error already says it: You cannot create an Integer out of the String: "Twain|Mark|The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn": It's not a numeric expression.

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int numberOfBooks = Integer.parseInt(textReader.readLine());

the line that textReader.readLine() returns (the String) is not a number, since it returns:

"Twain|Mark|The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn"
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Given that "The file in question contains a list of books with the following format: lastname|firstname|title."

When before the for loop you try int numberOfBooks = Integer.parseInt(textReader.readLine()); this throws an exception because it cannot convert a | separated string to an integer.

Assuming 1 book per line, the number of books is the total number of lines...

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