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If I use std::cin, std::cout and std::string, is there any possibility that someone will exploit the buffer overflow?

I ask this because I still see a lot of people that still use null-terminated strings instead of standard containers in C++.

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14  
A lot of people aren't coding in C++ -- they're using C++ to compile C code. –  cHao Nov 4 '11 at 20:28
    
A lot of people believe they are coding in C++ when they are actually coding in a subset of C... –  K-ballo Nov 4 '11 at 20:29
1  
If you use them correctly, then no. But then, same can be said about anything. –  Don Reba Nov 4 '11 at 20:34
2  
You could say it is harder to use std::string incorrectly in comparison to C-String –  Crappy Experience Bye Nov 4 '11 at 21:00

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It depends. Of course, when you use C-style code/API's, there is no difference.

But using STL or C++ idioms doesn't guarantee that you're safe.

C++ gives you the choice, always. Contrast these two near-identical twins:

int n;
std::cin >> n;
std::string s(n, '*'); // create a data store of given size

std::vector<char> v(1000);
std::copy(s.begin(), s.end(), v.begin()); // NOT safe if n > 1000

safe variant:

int n;
std::cin >> n;
if (n > MAX_LIMIT) 
    throw std::runtime_error("input too large");
std::string s(std::min(0, n), '*'); // note input sanitation

std::vector<char> v;
v.reserve(1000);
std::copy(s.begin(), s.end(), std::back_inserter(v)); // safe
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2  
std::vector v(); That looks vexing. –  James McNellis Nov 4 '11 at 20:53
    
@JamesMcNellis: crawling into the corner. (I just hope you can see that happened due to editing the first snippet into the second...) –  sehe Nov 4 '11 at 20:54
    
I see. This means if I use boundary checking on vectors and strings (at()), there is no way that someone will exploit buffer overflow in a different way. Thanks. –  milleniumbug Nov 4 '11 at 21:34
3  
Hm, I'm not sure about the conclusions. If you use everything correctly, then the only possible errors should be allocation errors, which are signalled via exceptions. So you shouldn't need any sort of ifs and buts. Your program is still a potential for a denial-of-service, though, say if it requests 20GB on a machine with ony 4GB physical RAM -- then the program is still entirely correct, but may force the OS to its knees. But that's outside the scope of "safe programming". –  Kerrek SB Nov 4 '11 at 21:53
1  
@milleniumbug: also, one point I tried to make is not so much the bounds checking, but rather to avoid the preallocation of fixed sizes. std::back_inserter(v) effectively calls v.push_back(...) repeatedly and thus the vector will grow as required. –  sehe Nov 4 '11 at 21:54

One of the big reasons you still see people using C-strings in C++ (besides not knowing about strings, or being stuck in a C mindset), is that std::istream::getline works with char pointers and not strings. As do a huge number of other parts of the library. Part of the reason for that was so that "you don't pay for what you don't use". IE: people that just want to get a line of text shouldn't have to instantiate a string (thereby also having to pull in another template class) to do so. You can use std::getline to get lines as strings if you want them, but that's not obvious. So some people think they still need to use char buffers to get a line of text.

(Seems a lot of that is changed in C++11, and you can use strings in a lot of places where you had to pass a char* before. Maybe that'll help a bit with the C-in-C++ problem.)

Standard strings and streams are designed to be overflow-resistant, and are all-around safer than a char pointer (at least when they're not used like a plain old array/pointer; blindly using str's iterator without regard for str.end() is usually a bad idea, but str.push_back(), str += "text", str.at(x), and stream insertion/extraction operators are perfectly safe). If you can use them, i highly recommend you do so.

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Still lot of people use null-terminated strings because they do not realize the convenience of using std::string and they are really writing procedural c++ not c++.

Most programmers migrating/migrated from c to c++ are the ones who still use null-terminated strings.

It is perfectly safe and you should use std::string in c++ wherever you can.

std:string actually protects you against buffer overflow(unlike c strings) by dynamically growing in size as the data added to it is increased.

An code sample:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{
    string str("std::String");
    for (int i=0; i<20; ++i)
    {
        cout << "capacity is " << str.capacity() << endl;
        str += " ,is Overrun safe string";
    }
    return 0;
}

Output:

capacity is 11
capacity is 35
capacity is 70
capacity is 140
capacity is 140
capacity is 140
capacity is 280
capacity is 280
capacity is 280
capacity is 280
capacity is 280
capacity is 280
capacity is 560
capacity is 560
capacity is 560
capacity is 560
capacity is 560
capacity is 560
capacity is 560
capacity is 560

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2  
"It is perfectly safe" - simply not true, see sehe's example. std::string is safe if you avoid accessing it out of bounds, but then again so are C-style strings. The difference is that you're less likely to need to worry about it with string, but the likelihood is not zero. –  Steve Jessop Nov 5 '11 at 0:03

C-strings may be faster, because std containers have to support some functionality that they support. So, nobody can point the best choice for all times.

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