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I have a WCF service that can receive several requests/minute (or seconds) that need to write information to the database. Rather than write it synchronously, I would like to place these requests in some sort of a queue on the server so that another proces can come along and process them. The client just needs an acknowledgement that the request was received. I have read a lot about MSMQ and WCF etc, but it seems that with MSMQ you write to the queue from client and not to the web service, which is not what I want.

Is there a way to do the following inside a WCF method that does not involve a database. Perhaps i have not grasped the concept of MSMQ right.

 public bool ProcessMessage(string message)
    {
      if(IsValid(message))
       return AddToQueue(message);

      return false;
    }

EDIT: I need to validate the message before writing to the queue.

share|improve this question
2  
Is there a reason why you don't want to write to the queue from the client? – Jeremy McGee Nov 4 '11 at 21:06
    
sorry, forgot to mention that I need to validate the message before writing to the queue. – Alex J Nov 4 '11 at 21:17
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I do this currently in an application I created. A WCF service is hosted as an HTTP Service on IIS. It accepts calls, and packets of data, I take that data, validate it (tell the caller it's wrong or not) then send the data to another WCF service that is using netMSMQ binding, that service then does the final writing to the database. The good thing about this is it will queue up on one MSMQ and the WCF Service that is bound to this MSMQ pops off one message at a time and processes it. The HTTP WCF service can then handle as many requests as it wants and does not have to worry about pooled up messages as that's the job of the WCF/MSMQ-bound service. The common name for this pattern is a Bridge framework.

ETA: the second service (the MSMQ-bound WCF Service) is run as a Windows service always on. It also handles separation of concerns. The HTTP service validates and does not care about the database, the other service handles writing to the Database.

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there is no way to do this with one single WCF service? – Alex J Nov 4 '11 at 23:47

The point of using MSMQ should be to remove the need for your service to worry about queueing anything. MSMQ will guarantee that your messages get delivered in the proper order and that your service processes them in the proper order.

Your service shouldn't maintain a queue at all if you set this up properly.

share|improve this answer
    
well, i don't want to use MSMQ necessarily, some other queuing mechanism that works for what I want is fine. I don't want to put any dependency on the client for MSMQ. Client should only be aware of WCF service as it can be any platform. Also, validating the message before writing to the queue is where it gets tricky. – Alex J Nov 4 '11 at 21:20
    
I really like Mark W's answer. I think maybe that's what you're really looking for... split up the validation from the queueing. Single responsibility principle and all that. :) – Tad Donaghe Nov 4 '11 at 21:26
    
Is MSMQ still supported? I feel like it is an older technology that isn't used anymore. This pattern would really help my team in an effort we are trying to execute. We want our webservice to take requests, and we want our broker to access and update a database for these requests, we are having a hard time finding a thread safe way of getting this done. – DmainEvent Dec 10 '15 at 13:46
    
To be honest, I'm not sure. I answered this back in 2011. I've been off the .Net stack for a few years now. – Tad Donaghe Dec 10 '15 at 18:35

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