Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know how to put an array in order, but in this case I just want to see if it is in order. An array of strings would be the easiest, I imagine, and answers on that front are appreciated, but an answer that includes the ability to check for order based on some arbitrary parameter is optimal.

Here's an example dataset. The name of:

[["a", 3],["b",53],["c",2]]

Where the elements are themselves arrays containing several elements, the first of which is a string. I want to see if the elements are in alphabetical order based on this string.

share|improve this question
    
woah... you just changed the question entirely. –  sethvargo Nov 4 '11 at 21:21
1  
Uh... no I didn't. I swapped out a generic example for a concrete example, that was all. Wanting to be able to compare on some arbitrary component of the array elements was a component of the original question. –  GlyphGryph Nov 4 '11 at 21:29

7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Let's open Enumerable to add the abstraction Enumerable#sorted?:

module Enumerable
  def sorted?
    each_cons(2).all? { |a, b| (a <=> b) <= 0 }
  end
end

[["a", 3], ["b", 53],["c", 2]].sorted? #=> true

I use (a <=> b) <= 0 instead of (the more declarative) a <= b because there are objects which implement the first method but not the second (i.e arrays. For some reason Array does not include the module Comparable).

You also say you'd like to have the ability "to check for order based on some arbitrary parameter". That in Ruby is a xyz_by(&block) method:

module Enumerable  
  def sorted_by?
    each_cons(2).all? { |a, b| ((yield a) <=> (yield b)) <= 0 }    
  end
end

[["a", 3], ["b", 53], ["c", 2]].sorted_by? { |k, v| v } #=> false

Note: if Ruby ever adds support for lazy enumerables ([edit] Ruby 2.0 has lazy enumerables!), we will be able to write Enumerable#sorted_by? more elegantly, using the abstraction we just created (and more efficiently: note how the previous implementation calls the block twice for all values except the first and last one):

module Enumerable  
  def sorted_by?(&block)
    lazy.map(&block).sorted?
  end
end
share|improve this answer
1  
If you use yield, don't add the block as a parameter. You also don't need self. +1 for adding the method to Enumerable instead of Arary. –  Guilherme Bernal Nov 5 '11 at 0:21

You can compare them two by two:

[["a", 3],["b",53],["c",2]].each_cons(2).all?{|p, n| (p <=> n) != 1} # => true
share|improve this answer
1  
A quick question: do you know why ary1 <=> ary2 does what you'd expect (a lexicographical comparison of two arrays) while ary1 < ary2 and friends fail (since those methods are not defined). Here p <= n would be so much nicer to write.. in other words: what's the problem with mixin module Comparable in Array?. –  tokland Nov 4 '11 at 21:47
    
It's a good question and I'm not sure there's a good reason. Rarely needed, but there would be no cost in including Comparable. The ruby-core thread (blade.nagaokaut.ac.jp/cgi-bin/vframe.rb/ruby/ruby-core/… ) agrees it should, but I don't think there has been a formal request. –  Marc-André Lafortune Nov 4 '11 at 23:46
    
thanks, I hadn't found that thread. I'll search old issues, maybe it's worth filing one issue about this. –  tokland Nov 5 '11 at 10:10

reduce can compare each element to the one before, and stop when it finds one out of order:

array.reduce{|prev,l| break unless l[0] >= prev[0]; l}
share|improve this answer

If it turns out the array isn't sorted, will your next action always be to sort it? For that use case (though of course depending on the number of times the array will already be sorted), you may not want to check whether it is sorted, but instead simply choose to always sort the array. Sorting an already sorted array is pretty efficient with many algorithms and merely checking whether an array is already sorted is not much less work, making checking + sorting more work than simply always sorting.

share|improve this answer

Iterate over the objects and make sure each following element is >= the current element (or previous is <=, obviously) the current element.

share|improve this answer

For this to work efficiently you will want to sort during insertion. If you are dealing with unique items, a SortedSet is also an option.

For clarification, if we patch array to allow for a sorted insertion, then we can keep the array in a sorted state:

class Array
  def add_sorted(o)
    size = self.size
    if size == 0
      self << o
    elsif self.last < o
      self << o
    elsif self.first > o
      self.insert(0, o)
    else
      # This portion can be improved by using a binary search instead of linear
      self.each_with_index {|n, i| if n > o; self.insert(i, o); break; end}
    end
  end
end

a = []
12.times{a.add_sorted(Random.rand(10))}
p a # => [1, 1, 2, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5, 5, 7]

or to use the built in sort:

class Array
  def add_sorted2(o)
    self << o
    self.sort
  end
end

or, if you are dealing with unique items:

require "set"
b = SortedSet.new
12.times{b << Random.rand(10)}
p b # => #<SortedSet: {1, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9}>
share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand what you mean here. –  GlyphGryph Nov 4 '11 at 21:38
    
Hey GlyphGryph, I added the monkeypatch for Array above to illustrate the general approach of keeping an array in a sorted state. –  Sean Vikoren Nov 7 '11 at 16:56
    
That's... not actually relevant to the question, then. Sorry. I didn't want to sort an array, just see if an array was sorted. –  GlyphGryph Nov 7 '11 at 17:42
    
GlyphGryph, tokland already posted a great way to test for sorted. My post was in case the issue of speed came up. In that case, it will usually serve you better to keep your list in a sorted state. It will reduce your code for checking if the list is sorted to 'nothing' as it will always be sorted ;) –  Sean Vikoren Nov 8 '11 at 16:14
def ascending? (array)
    yes = true
    array.reduce { |l, r| break unless yes &= (l[0] <= r[0]); l }
    yes
end


def descending? (array)
    yes = true
    array.reduce { |l, r| break unless yes &= (l[0] >= r[0]); l }
    yes
end
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.