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This prototype does not match the definition. How do i fix it? I threw a const on b.c. I thought that might do it. But not go

I know it needs the template designator in the definition even though it does not use the template...because this was a previous error.

// Prototype

template <class T> class dynamic_array
  {
  public:
    void print_operator(ostream)const;
  };

// Definition

template <class T> void dynamic_array<T>::print_operator(ostream &os=cout)const
  {
  for (int i = 0; i < size; i++) os << array[i] << endl;
  }
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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
  1. Your default argument is in the implementation, it should be in the prototype
  2. The implementation takes a reference, the prototype needs to take a reference too
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1  
The default value for the argument can be in either the declaration or the definition (but not both). –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 4 '11 at 21:38
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: I should dispute that. If I say foo() and the declaration says foo(int, int, int), how can the TU know which arguments to insert?? –  Kerrek SB Nov 4 '11 at 22:53
    
@KerrekSB: I was surprised at first with it, but you can provide default values for some parameters in the declaration and for some others in the definition. You can only skip the arguments for which the compiler has a default value in the current TU. So for example you could provide a single default value in your foo and then users anywhere could call foo(1,2) and have the third one defaulted. Then provide extra values in the definition and code that sees that definition could use foo(). As you say the caller cannot inject default values that it does not know about. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 5 '11 at 4:41
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: very interesting! But I take it that within one TU, only one function declaration/definition may take default arguments? If I put two in to the same file (e.g. one in the declaration at the top, and another in the implementation at the bottom), I get an error saying "default argument given after previous specification...". –  Kerrek SB Nov 5 '11 at 12:56
1  
@KerrekSB That's almost true. You can't have two specifications for the default value of one parameter that are in the same scope, even if they give the same value. see § 8.3.6.(4) of the 2011 standard. void f(int a, int b) { cout << a << " " << b << endl; } void g() { void f(int, int = 7); f(2); } int main(int, char**) { void f(int, int = 5); f(1); g(); } prints 1 5 2 7 –  je4d Nov 5 '11 at 13:29

You're using a reference so replace print_operator() with:

void print_operator(ostream&)const;

Oh and size and array must be declared elsewhere.

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You have ostream in one place and ostream& in the other. You should have ostream& in both places:

template <class T> class dynamic_array
{
public:
  void print_operator(ostream&)const;
};
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Your declaration takes an ostream but your definition uses ostream&.

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