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What's up guys,

I am trying to overload the addition operator for my math vector class. My (seemingly logically correct) simplified code is:

template<typename T>
class Vector2
{
private:
    T       m_data[2];

    template<typename U>
    friend auto operator+(Vector2<T> a, Vector2<U> b) -> Vector2<decltype(a.m_data[0] + b.m_data[0])>
    {
        Vector2<decltype(a.m_data[0] + b.m_data[0])> ret(   a.m_data[0] + b.m_data[0],
                                                            a.m_data[1] + b.m_data[1]   );

        return ret;
    }

public:
    inline Vector2(T x, T y)
    {
        m_data[0] = x;
        m_data[1] = y;
    }
};

int main()
{
    Vector2<float>  v1(0.5f, 0.5f);
    Vector2<float>  v2(1, 2);

    v2 + v1; // Line 29

    return 0;
}

However, GCC 4.6.1 gave me this:

W:\projects\Awesome\BetterStuff\main.cpp||In function 'Vector2<decltype ((a.m_data[0] + b.m_data[0]))> operator+(Vector2<T>, Vector2<U>) [with U = float; T = float; decltype ((a.m_data[0] + b.m_data[0])) = float]':|
W:\projects\Awesome\BetterStuff\main.cpp|5|error: 'float Vector2<float>::m_data [2]' is private|
W:\projects\Awesome\BetterStuff\main.cpp|29|error: within this context|
||=== Build finished: 2 errors, 0 warnings (0 minutes, 0 seconds) ===|

And if I changed the second vector to an int vector, it would give me more (similar) errors.

The closest I came to figuring this thing out was finding this interesting page: http://gcc.gnu.org/bugzilla/show_bug.cgi?id=48884

But sadly, I couldn't use it for solving my own problem. I tried GCC 4.6.2 and 4.7.0 but my code didn't compile either.

Changing "private" to "public" indeed solves my problem, but obviously my intention is not to expose m_data;

I just want to define an addition operator that its return type is determined by the template parameters, which from my understanding is, a compile time thing - for each instantiation of the template function, the compiler automatically figures out the return type based on the decltype() there. I mean, in which way main() is trying to access the contents of m_data for one of these vectors?

This whole thing is confusing me, any help would be greatly appreciated.

OK thanks

share|improve this question
    
If anyone is interested, since I'm using numeric types (which have 0-parameters constructors) as the template parameters for Vector2, I figured I can just replace the old decltype with this: decltype(T() + U()). I am still interested though how come the compiler hates my code. –  phhkafot Nov 5 '11 at 0:38
    
Interestingly, decltype(T() + U()) works if both v1 and v2 are float (i.e. the same type). At least it does for 4.7. It still doesn't for float + int. –  emsr Nov 5 '11 at 4:12

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, GCC is right... The problem was not that Vector2(float) was trying to access Vector(int)'s private members, but that operator+ (which is only a friend of Vector2(float)) was trying to access Vector2(int)'s private members. So the updated code is:

template<typename T>
class Vector2
{
    template<typename U>
    friend class Vector2;

private:
    T       m_data[2];

    template<typename T1, typename U>
    friend auto operator+(Vector2<T1> a, Vector2<U> b) -> Vector2<decltype(a.m_data[0] + b.m_data[0])>;

public:
    inline Vector2(T x, T y)
    {
        m_data[0] = x;
        m_data[1] = y;
    }

    inline Vector2<T>& operator=(const Vector2<T>& vec)
    {
        m_data[0] = vec.m_data[0];
        m_data[1] = vec.m_data[1];
    }
};

template<typename T, typename U>
auto operator+(Vector2<T> a, Vector2<U> b) -> Vector2<decltype(a.m_data[0] + b.m_data[0])>
{
    Vector2<decltype(T() + U())> ret(   a.m_data[0] + b.m_data[0],
                                        a.m_data[1] + b.m_data[1]   );

    return ret;
}

int main()
{
    Vector2<float>  v1(0.5f, 0.5f);
    Vector2<int>    v2(1, 2);

    //Vector2<int>  a = v2 + v1; // Doesn't work
    Vector2<float>  b = v2 + v1; // Works

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

The problem is that Vector2<T> and Vector2<U> are different completely unrelated classes if T != U. What you are trying to do is the same as having a class A access the private members of an unrelated class B.

Provide proper accessors for your Vector2 (perhaps subscript operator), and implement your operators using such public interfaces.

share|improve this answer
    
I understand. I strongly prefer being able to access the private members of the vector class - that's also why I defined my operator as a friend. But I'm adding two Vector2<float>'s, so how is it possible that a Vector<float> can't access another Vector<float>'s private members? –  phhkafot Nov 4 '11 at 23:40
    
What's interesting is in his code and error message, both T and U are floats. I guess it's a hyper-paranoid compiler? –  Mooing Duck Nov 4 '11 at 23:40
    
Actually, I was using MSVC++ until a couple of days ago. I switched to GCC because of the lack of C++11 features in MSVC++. As far as I know, GCC is pretty solid, am I not right? :) –  phhkafot Nov 4 '11 at 23:46
    
@Matan: Yeah, the release versions of GCC are pretty solid. –  Mooing Duck Nov 6 '11 at 17:14

Put simply: You cannot access private members of another class. Vector2<float> and Vector2<int> are different classes. You can fix by adding this to your class

template<typename T> friend class Vector2;

Which will friend all types of Vector2. Then you can access the privates of another Vector2.

share|improve this answer
    
Following K-ballo's answer I tried to add this line to the Vector2 class, but somehow absolutely nothing has changed... Same errors –  phhkafot Nov 4 '11 at 23:43
    
@Matan: You should post that last edit an answer and mark it as an answer, since the rest of us were all wrong. –  Mooing Duck Nov 6 '11 at 17:13
    
Yep I'm new here, just wanted to give you some extra reputation for your help, but it does make sense to post my edit as an answer... thanks –  phhkafot Nov 6 '11 at 23:25

Don't use a private member in decltype as noted above. Also, I made the addition operator public. I don't think that's unreasonable. I also added coodinate accessors. This works:

template<typename T>
class Vector2
{
private:
    T       m_data[2];
public:
    template<typename U>
    friend auto operator+(Vector2<T> a, Vector2<U> b) -> Vector2<decltype(T() + U())>
    {
        Vector2<decltype(T() + U())> ret( a[0] + b[0],
                                          a[1] + b[1] );

        return ret;
    }
    inline Vector2(T x, T y)
    {
        m_data[0] = x;
        m_data[1] = y;
    }
    inline T operator[](int c) const { return m_data[c]; }
};

int main()
{
    Vector2<float>  v1(0.5f, 0.5f);
    Vector2<int>  v2(1, 2);

    v2 + v1; // Line 29

    return 0;
}

assuming T and U have default ctors.

share|improve this answer
    
If you put 'int' for v2 as I suspect you meant to do you get issues of private data again. I think you need (and want) some public way of getting individual coordinates no? –  emsr Nov 5 '11 at 3:45
    
Again, there are many ways to solve this problem if I access m_data using a public function, but I'm trying to avoid it. Maybe the operator+ was not a very good example since I'm guessing my actual code for it would be "a += b; return b;". But still, for functions like CrossProduct, I want to be able to access m_data even if it's private. –  phhkafot Nov 5 '11 at 10:24

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