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I have a table with an IsDirty column that I want to be "1" when a row is updated, but I also want to be able to set the IsDirty flag back to "0" explicitly. So I created a trigger:

FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN

 IF NEW.IsDirty = 0 AND OLD.IsDirty=1 THEN
  SET NEW.IsDirty = 0;
 ELSE SET NEW.IsDirty = 1;
 END IF; 

END;

With this trigger, updating any column sets the IsDirty column to 1. And I can also "UPDATE table_name SET IsDirty = 0 WHERE xxx=123" -- works great to turn IsDirty "off".

But if I do that twice in a row (the "UPDATE table_name SET IsDirty = 0 WHERE xxx=123"), it sets IsDirty to 1 again. Do it again, sets it to 0. And back and forth, toggling it each time. Looking at my trigger, I can see how that would happen. So I changed it to this:

FOR EACH ROW
BEGIN

IF NEW.IsDirty = 0 AND OLD.IsDirty=1 THEN
 SET NEW.IsDirty = 0;
ELSEIF NEW.IsDirty = 0 AND OLD.IsDirty=0 THEN
 SET NEW.IsDirty = 0;
ELSE SET NEW.IsDirty = 1;
END IF; 

But now updating any column other than IsDirty no longer sets IsDirty to 1. The only way to set it to 1 now is to update the IsDirty column explicitly.

What am I doing wrong? I just want to have IsDirty turn on when a column is updated, and also be able to turn it off, even twice in a row and have it stay off.

Thanks for your help!

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1 Answer 1

Well, I ended up doing this trigger a bit differently. Instead of getting all tangled up in trying to determine if an update is just a change in data on the row, vs. a change in the IsDirty flag only, vs. both, vs. neither...

I ended up changing the requirement to: "if you want to reset the IsDirty flag; ie. set it to zero -- then set it to -1 in the update statement". So it's very explicit and clear.

So now the trigger looks like this:

BEGIN
  SET NEW.EffectiveDate = current_timestamp;
  IF NEW.IsDirty = -1 THEN
    BEGIN
      SET NEW.IsDirty = 0;
    END;
  ELSE
    SET NEW.IsDirty = 1;
  END IF;
END    

And an UPDATE statement that wants to reset the IsDirty column looks like this example:

UPDATE task_set SET IsDirty = -1 WHERE CategoryID = 20
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