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I need to listen to a network broadcast coming over UDP. The datagram contains a j4cDAC_broadcast struct. I have tried following a few tutorials, but they seem to have left a few things out and dont have very detailed explanations, if any.

With what I have right now I am getting an error BIND FAILED 10049 and error 10049 indicates that the address is unavailable. The broadcast is coming in on 255.255.255.255:7654. How do I fix this error?

This is what I have so far:

void test() 
    {
    WSADATA  wsd;
    SOCKET s;
    j4cDAC_broadcast recieve;
    char *read = (char*) malloc(sizeof(j4cDAC_broadcast));
    int ret;
    DWORD dwSenderSize;
    sockaddr_in local;

    if (WSAStartup(MAKEWORD(2,2),&wsd) != 0)
        {
        cout << "WSAStartup failed";
        exit(1);
        }

    local.sin_family = AF_INET;
    local.sin_port = htons ((short)BCASTPORT);
    local.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr(BCASTIP);


    s = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_DGRAM, 0 );

    if (s == INVALID_SOCKET)
        {
        cout << "SOCKET FAILED!: " << WSAGetLastError();               
        exit(1);
        }

    int bnd = bind(s,(SOCKADDR*) &local,sizeof(local) );

    if (bnd != 0 )
        {
        cout << "BIND FAILED: " << WSAGetLastError();     //fails here
        return;
        }


    ret = recv (s, read,sizeof(j4cDAC_broadcast),0);

    if (ret == SOCKET_ERROR)
        {
        cout << "RECIEVE FAILED " << WSAGetLastError();            
        return;
        }

    memcpy(&recieve,read,sizeof(read));


    closesocket(s);

    WSACleanup();
    }

Also, another thing I couldn't find was how to get the IP address of the sender out of the header.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't bind to the broacast address; you bind to the machine's local IP (or 0.0.0.0 for all of them). The broadcasts will reach the socket all the same. That's why it's a broadcast. The logic of "this packet is sent to a broadcast address, means we wanna receive it" happens on the TCP/IP stack level.

Don't bind to 127.0.0.1.

To get the sender's address, use recvfrom() and note the penultimate parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
In Python, at least, 0.0.0.0 doesn't work if you open more than one client, so what you have then is point to point, thereby defeating the idea of a broadcast. Binding to the local IP (e.g. 192.168.1.100) doesn't work at all. –  fyngyrz Jun 17 '12 at 21:12

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