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I asked this question about a week ago, and while I got one response I never updated it; I also explained it badly to begin with. So, here goes again.

<elementA>text</elementA>
    <elementF>text</elementF>
    <elementE>text</elementE>
        <elementD>text</elementD>   <-- This gets missed
    <elementC>text</elementC>
    <elementB>text</elementB>
        <elementA>text</elementA>   <-- xmlNodePtr node
        <elementA>text</elementA>
    <elementA>text</elementA>
    <elementA>text</elementA>
<elementA>text</elementA>

So given the above, how would I walk backwards hitting every node? To walk forward I would use this function (haven't tested it yet). Perhaps a dumb question, but it seems to me if I simply reverse it it's going to skip the above, no? I feel like I'm missing something obvious.

htmlNodePtr find_element_by_tag(htmlNodePtr startNode, string tagname)
{
    // Loop through all nodes
    for (htmlNodePtr node = startNode; node != NULL; node = node->next)
    {
        // Only

     interested in Element nodes
            if(node->type == XML_ELEMENT_NODE)
            {
                // Compare to search tagname
                if(xmlStrcasecmp(node->name, (const xmlChar*)tagname.c_str()) == 0)
                {
                    // If found return node pointer
                    return node;
                }
                // Recursively depth walk children nodes as well
                if(node->children != NULL)
                    {
                        this->find_element_by_tag(node->children);
                    }
            }
        }

        // If not found return NULL pointer
    return NULL;
}
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

At first I read your question incorrectly so my first answer was wrong. I think this can work (pseudo C++):

nodePtr reverse_find(nodePtr start, string tag)
{
    // check current node and previous siblings
    for (node = start; node != NULL; node = node->prev)
    {
        if (tag == node->name) { return node; }
        result = find_element_by_tag(node, tag);
        if (result) { return result; }
    }

    // not found, start looking at the parent nodes
    if (node->parent)
    {
        if (tag == node->parent->name) { return node->parent; }

        if (node->parent->prev)
        {
            if (tag == node->parent->prev->name) { return node->parent->prev; } 

            result = reverse_find(node->parent->prev, tag);
            if (result) { return result; }
        }
    }
    return NULL;
}
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I think that is basically what I came up with, but to realize it didn't work. Since that doesn't traverse children of the parent's siblings it would skip over that one I pointed out above. That makes sense right? I'm starting to see how to do this, but it seems more complicated than need be. –  kryptobs2000 Nov 5 '11 at 19:41
    
@kryptobs2000: it does traverse the children of the parent's siblings, the find_element_by_tag() call in the first for loop would find the one you pointed out (the reverse_find() function uses your original find_element_by_tag() function to do that) –  rve Nov 5 '11 at 20:54
    
Ah, thanks, I didn't read that close enough apparently. Well thank you, I'll find out after work for sure, but it looks like this will work : ). –  kryptobs2000 Nov 5 '11 at 21:30
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This is an easy transformation of a recursive solution for forward traversal.

Consider your code for forward traversal. It essentially does this:

traverse_forward(node):
    for each node sibling in forward order:
        if sibling satisfies condition:
            do something with child
        if sibling has children:
            traverse_forward(first child of sibling)

You can reverse the order of the loop, and do recursive call to process children before you process the node itself, yielding the following algorithm:

traverse_backward(node):
    for each node sibling in reverse order:
        if sibling has children:
            traverse_backward(last child of sibling)
        if sibling satisfies condition:
            do something with child

To traverse siblings in reverse order, you use the same loop, but use ->prev field instead of the ->next field. To get the last child instead of the first one, you use ->last field instead of the ->children field.

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This works when you start at the root. If I understand the question correctly, he starts at a leaf and wants to traverse back to the root. –  rve Nov 5 '11 at 13:12
    
That would work if I started at the root as rve said, but that's not where I am. So that does help clarify one aspect of my problem, but you still need to step up into the parents and then walk over them as well. Maybe I can figure it out now... –  kryptobs2000 Nov 5 '11 at 19:37
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