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I am trying to write a function to change some folder names, but I am having difficulties in the actual declaration.

Here is my code:

void ChangeVersion(char* NewVer)
{
    ifstream show_current_version;
    show_current_version.open(*removed*);
    char show_current_version_var[1024];
    if (show_current_version.is_open())
    {
        while (!show_current_version.eof())
        {
              show_current_version >> show_current_version_var;
        }                                         
    }
    show_current_version.close();
    // show_current_version_var is old version
    char OldVersion[1024] = show_current_version_var;

    // start rename
    cout << "Changing versions...";
    rename("*removed*", OldVersion);
    rename(NewVer, "*removed*");
    cout << "done!" << endl; 
} 

As you can tell, I am new to c++...

I have read on various c++ tutorial websites, that if you want a function to not return anything, then you declare it as void. However when I did this, my compiler says invalid initializer. I am using dev-cpp.

I am thinking it is because my function is outputting text, but on the websites, the void function has some cout statements...

I have tried initializing it with char*, like my other functions, yet I get the same error. Same with int and char.

Thank you for reading.

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this is in a header file, hence no libraries. –  Jared Nov 5 '11 at 7:05
    
Why the loop? I guess that the version number is stored in the file, but is it the only thing stored in the file? But more importantly, you have to show us how you call this function. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 5 '11 at 7:05
    
Here is a good C++ book that you can download for free: Thinking in C++ –  Wizetux Nov 5 '11 at 7:08
    
"this is in a header file, hence no libraries". Your implementation code should not be in the header file. That's not what header files are for. Header files are for saying "this is what you can do". Implementation files are for saying "... and this is how it works". –  Karl Knechtel Nov 5 '11 at 7:53
    
Error messages include line numbers that tell you where the error was detected. You should check where it's claiming to have a problem, and not guess. –  Karl Knechtel Nov 5 '11 at 7:54

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You really should give the output of the compiler a closer look. It generally tells you what line contains the error, which gives you a lot to work with.

Getting to the particular problem the offending line (from what I gather, havent tried compiling) is:

char OldVersion[1024] = show_current_version_var;

You can't assign a variable to a static array like that. There's only a handful of things one can use to initialize a static array. For example:

char OldVersion[1024] = "Static string";
char example[1024] = { 0 };

Try doing:

char OldVersion[1024];
strncpy(OldVersion, show_current_version_var, 1024);
// Null-terminate the string for good measure
OldVersion[1023] = 0;

Or simply use show_current_version_var where you would use OldVersion (I see no reason to copy the string in the code you pasted).

Anyway, I don't know what you're trying to accomplish, but you really should read up on C++. It's a rather tricky language to use.

share|improve this answer
    
You would be better to use strncpy instead of strcpy since I don't think you can be sure that show_current_version_var will have a null character at the end. –  Wizetux Nov 5 '11 at 7:06
    
You can't be sure that strncpy() will put a null at the end either; it doesn't if there isn't enough space in the target array (and it puts lots of nulls at the end if there is more than enough space). –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 5 '11 at 7:13
    
Since this is a C++ question I woul prefer not to use any of the str<X>() functions as these are all C. Prefer std::string. –  Loki Astari Nov 5 '11 at 7:16

Couple of small things

When you post code, post everything that we need to compile it:

// You need these to make it compile.
#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>

using namespace std;

OK. Bugs:

show_current_version.open(*removed*);
                          ^^^^^^^^^   What is this supposed to be ?

This function is expecting a C-String. So "removed" is valid. But the stars * don't make sense.

char OldVersion[1024] = show_current_version_var;

You can't copy arrays like that:

char OldVersion[1024];
std::copy(show_current_version_var, show_current_version_var+1024, OldVersion);

What would be better though is to use std::vector rather than an array. Then you are allowed to copy.

std::vector<char>   show_current_version_var(1024);
// STUFF
std::vector<char>   OldVersion(show_current_version_var);

Alternatively if you are specifically storing strings (not blobs of char) then std::string is probably your best bet.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm assuming removed was some sensitive stuff that the OP didn't want us to see. –  paxdiablo Nov 5 '11 at 7:04
    
Also, when you have an error, post the complete error message; copy and paste. –  Karl Knechtel Nov 5 '11 at 7:53

I don't think that you can do this:

char OldVersion[1024] = show_current_version_var;

You can only initialise arrays with a brace-list (like {'p', 'a', 'x'} for example).

Instead, you should try:

char OldVersion[1024];
memcpy (OldVersion, show_current_version_var, sizeof (OldVersion));

A complete, compilable version is shown below:

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <cstring>
using namespace std;
void ChangeVersion(char* NewVer)
{
    ifstream show_current_version;
    show_current_version.open("qqq");
    char show_current_version_var[1024];
    if (show_current_version.is_open())
    {
        while (!show_current_version.eof())
        {
              show_current_version >> show_current_version_var;
        }
    }
    show_current_version.close();
    // show_current_version_var is old version
    char OldVersion[1024];
    memcpy (OldVersion, show_current_version_var, sizeof (OldVersion));

    // start rename
    cout << "Changing versions...";
    rename("*removed*", OldVersion);
    rename(NewVer, "*removed*");
    cout << "done!" << endl;
}

int main() {
    return 0;
}
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