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Working on implementing my own BST in C++ for the experience of dealing with such structures.

I've had trouble implementing a destructor. I found in my studies, that one can't really have a recursive destructor (due to a flag that doesn't allow the destructor to be called on the same object after having been called), but I'm not really sure of any other way to successfully clean up all the nodes in the tree.

To compensate, I've created a helper function - however this throws an unresolved external error on the 'delete n' line. Any tips?

Code:

void BinSearchTree::Clear(tNode* n)
{
    if (n->left != NULL)
        Clear(n->left);
    if (n->right != NULL)
        Clear(n->right);
    delete n;
    n = NULL;
    size--;
}
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2  
Its has nothing to do with the problem, but you don't need to set the variable n to NULL, since it's not accessed any more in the function. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 5 '11 at 6:59
    
@JoachimPileborg The null state is set just because Clear can be called independently of the destructor to reset the tree. I was originally testing for a lack of a valid root pointer to determine if the tree was initialized, prior to having a size data member to keep track of such things. –  DivinusVox Nov 5 '11 at 7:08
    
Out of curiosity, does anyone know if size is generally a tracked value in standard implementations of trees? I see little use for it, since an iterative loop isn't realistic on the model. –  DivinusVox Nov 5 '11 at 7:10
3  
The variable n is local to the this function. Setting it to NULL in the function will not set it to NULL outside the function, then you need to pass n either as a reference to a pointer(tNode *&) or as a pointer to a pointer (tNode **). –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 5 '11 at 7:15
    
Do you have parent pointers in your nodes? –  avakar Nov 5 '11 at 7:19

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can have a recursive destructor; what you can't do is delete the same object twice.

A typical way to delete a tree in C++ might be something like this:

BinSearchTree::~BinSearchTree()
{
   delete _rootNode;  // will recursively delete all nodes below it as well
}

tNode::~tNode()
{
   delete left;
   delete right;
}

Regarding the unresolved external error -- is that error thrown when you try to compile/link the program? If so, it's probably because the code for the tNode class (and in particular the tNode destructor, if you declared one) doesn't exist or isn't getting compiled into your project.

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The problem is that in you class you probably declared that the node structure has a custom destructor, but you don't provide it so at link time the compiler is complaining a piece is missing.

If you don't need any more custom code in the destructor then you can just remove the destructor from the struct declaration and your program will compile fine.

Note however that there is no problem at all to have a destructor of to destory children nodes (see Brendan Long answer). If you ran into problems while attempting that the issue you faced must me something else.

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Just use a destructors. It sounds like your problem is that you were trying to call the destructors directly, but the language handles this for you. They're called either when you leave a stack allocated object's scope, or when you delete an object.

All you should need is this:

~BinSearchTree() {
    delete left;
    delete right;
}

delete will call their destructors.

Note: It's perfectly safe to delete NULL, it has no effect.

share|improve this answer
    
@JeremyFriesner - You're right. Sorry, must be more tired than I thought. –  Brendan Long Nov 5 '11 at 7:04
    
There is no need to test the pointers for null. –  James McNellis Nov 5 '11 at 7:06
    
Yeah just fixed that too. Needed to look it up to make sure it was safe since I don't do C++ very often. –  Brendan Long Nov 5 '11 at 7:07

Previous answers have pointed out that the unresolved external error is likely caused by a tNode destructor that is declared but not defined in a translation unit that the linker can see.

However, you have a second error: You appear to believe that setting n to null does something it doesn't do. The pointer value n is passed by value, not by reference, such that changing its value (e.g. by assigning NULL) has no effect after the function returns.

This will probably give you errors when you clear the tree and expect the root node pointer to have been set to NULL, when it remains a dangling pointer to freed memory. The result will be runtime error, not your linker error.

void BinSearchTree::Clear(tNode **N)
{
    tNode * n = *N;
    if (n->left != NULL)
        Clear(n->left);
    if (n->right != NULL)
        Clear(n->right);
    delete n;
    *N = NULL;
    size--;
}

Will do what you expect.

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How about automating it:

class BinSearchTree
{
    std::auto_ptr<tNode>   left;
    std::auto_ptr<tNode>   right;

    BinSearchTree(BinSearchTree const&);
    BinSearchTree& operator=(BinSearchTree const&); // private
};

Now destruction is automatic. :-)

share|improve this answer
    
What would Google say: "Did you mean unique_ptr"? :) –  avakar Nov 5 '11 at 7:18
    
Only if you have C++11 turned on. std::auto_ptr is perfect for this. –  Loki Astari Nov 5 '11 at 7:24
1  
If you assign one binary search tree to another, the children will be kidnapped. Is that really what you want? –  FredOverflow Nov 5 '11 at 7:31
    
Better kidnapped than cloned. By implication the BinSearchTree already has copy construcctor and assignment operator defined (otherwise the RAW pointers would be cloned thus leading to double delete). So I made the assumption that they were defined, but even if they are not this technique may allow kidnap but this is better than being cloned. –  Loki Astari Nov 5 '11 at 11:23

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