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I'm pretty new at C programming, and this type of thing keeps popping up. As a simple example, suppose I have a struct http_header with some char pointers:

struct http_header {
    char* name;
    char* value;
};

I want to fill an http_header where value is the string representation of an int. I "feel" like, semantically, I should be able to write a function that takes in an empty header pointer, a name string, and an int and fills out the header appropriately.

void fill_header(struct http_header *h, char* name, int value)
{
    h->name = name;
    char *value_str = malloc(100);
    sprintf(value_str, "%d", value);
    h->value = value_str;
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    struct http_header h;
    char *name = "Header Name";
    int val = 42;
    fill_header(&h, name, val);
    ...
    free(h.value);
}

Here, the calling code reads exactly as my intent, but in this case I'm creating the value string dynamically, which means I'd have to free it later. That doesn't smell right to me; it seems like the caller then knows too much about the implementation of fill_header. And in actual implementations it may not be so easy to know what to free: consider filling an array of http_headers where only one of them needed to have its value malloced.

To get around this, I'd have to create the string beforehand:

void fill_header2(struct http_header *h, char* name, char *value_str)
{
    h->name = name;
    h->value = value_str;
}

int main(int argc, const char * argv[])
{
    struct http_header h;
    char *name = "Header Name";
    int value = 42;

    char value_str[100];
    sprintf(value_str, "%d", value);
    fill_header2(&h, name, value_str);
}

As this pattern continues down the chain of structures with pointers to other structures, I end up doing so much work in top level functions the lower level ones seem hardly worth it. Furthermore, I've essentially sacrificed the "fill a header with an int" idea which I set out to write in the first place. I'm I missing something here? Is there some pattern or design choice that will make my life easier and keep my function calls expressing my intent?

P.S. Thanks to all at Stackoverfow for being the best professor I've ever had.

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1  
This problem is called "object ownership", and it's a synonym for "pain". There are several solutions (from auto pointers to garbage collection), but I vote on the most efficient way: design the ownership strategy of a program/class/method (function). Good luck! –  ern0 Nov 5 '11 at 8:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well, I would go with the first approach (with a twist), and also provide a destroy function:

struct http_header *make_header(char *name, int value)
{
    struct http_header *h = malloc(sizeof *h);
    /* ... */
    return h;
}

void destroy_header(struct http_header *h)
{
    free(h->name);
    free(h);
}

This way the caller doesn't have to know anything about http_header.

You might also get away with a version that leaves the main allocation (the struct itself) to the caller and does it's own internal allocation. Then you would have to provide a clear_header which only frees that fill allocated. But this clear_header leaves you with a partially-valid object.

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Yep, that's correct. See also: factory pattern ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Factory_method_pattern ). It is used when the object creation is more complex than just create it with new or malloc(). Also, welcome to the world of real programming. –  ern0 Nov 5 '11 at 8:42
    
Thanks, all. I suppose encapsulation in constructor/destructor type calls is what I need. I've always heard warnings that "malloc is slow"---and of course it is, compared to allocating on the stack---but how concerned do I really need to be? Using it repeatedly for little structures like this seems inefficient if I'll be doing it often. But in production code would that make a significant difference? I guess, if it is properly encapsulated, I could change it later to dole out pre-allocated headers instead of using malloc/free. –  Sam Britt Nov 7 '11 at 23:53

I think your problem is simply that you are programming asymmetrically. You should once and for all decide who is responsible for the string inside your structure. Then you should have two functions, not only one, that should be called something like header_init and header_destroy.

For the init function I'd be a bit more careful. Check for a 0 argument of your pointer, and initialize your DS completely, something like *h = (http_header){ .name = name }. You never know if you or somebody will end up in adding another field to your structure. So by that at least all other fields are initialized with 0.

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I like that idea, "programming asymmetrically." You're right, I should be thinking more in those terms. Thanks. –  Sam Britt Nov 5 '11 at 8:31

If you are new at C programming, you might perhaps want to use the Boehm's conservative garbage collector. Boehm's GC works very well in practice, and by using it systematically in your own code you could use GC_malloc instead of malloc and never bother about calling free or GC_free.

Hunting memory leaks in C (or even C++) code is often a headache. There are tools (like valgrind) which can help you, but you could decide to not bother by using Boehm's GC.

Garbage collection (and memory management) is a global property of a program, so if you use Boehm's GC you should decide that early.

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Thanks, but my question wasn't really about memory leaks. More about design decisions. –  Sam Britt Nov 5 '11 at 9:00
    
But memory leaks are often the consequence of design decisions. And design decisions should also be dictated by the global properties of your program -those properties which are not modular! –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 5 '11 at 9:12

The general solution to your problem is that of object ownership, as others have suggested. The simplest solution to your particular problem is, however, to use a char array for value, i.e., char value[12]. 2^32 has 10 decimal digits, +1 for the sign, +1 for the null-terminator.

You should ensure that 1) int is not larger than 32-bits at compile-time, 2) ensure that the value is within some acceptable range (HTTP codes have only 3 digits) before calling sprintf, 3) use snprintf.

So by using a static array you get rid of the ownership problem, AND you use less memory.

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Do you mean a char array in the definition of struct http_header? I was hoping to have that be a bit more generic, and not be limited to purely ints for values. –  Sam Britt Nov 5 '11 at 18:31
    
Yes, that's what I mean. In general, avoid dynamic memory allocation if doing so is feasible (e.g., won't waste memory), so you will avoid any issues of object ownership. –  zvrba Nov 5 '11 at 21:41

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