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While thinking of a way to pretty print table header i found that integers are right aligned by default, but strings are left aligned.

For example:

>>> for i in (1,'x',0.0):
...     print("{0:5}".format(i))
... 
    1
x    
  0.0

This is easily fixed by setting alignment explicitly, but i wonder why is this so?

EDIT:

I am not looking for a way to align strings, it is easy:

>>> for i in (1,'x',0.0):
...     print("{0:>5}".format(i))
... 
    1
    x
  0.0

I just thought that all objects would be aligned the same way by deafult and i'm asking why is it not so.

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1  
I think it's just considered natural. It's the standard formatting in most spreadsheet programs, too. –  Sven Marnach Nov 5 '11 at 9:55

3 Answers 3

Probably you are looking for something like this

print ( "%5s" % ('x',) )
print ( "%5d" % (245,) )

which outputs

    x
  245

For the question 'why' I think an answer is that when you read some data in column you actually expect string to be left aligned

a
ab
abc

and not

   a
  ab
 abc

Also text in books is left aligned. For number most natural formatting is right aligned

  7
 45
156   

Which for istance is the way of arranging numbers for sum, subtraction and multiplication. Python choice actually reflects typographic conventions. Mixing text and numbers in a table may be considered a special case.

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Ok, so how do you do it with the new-style format strings? –  agf Nov 5 '11 at 11:47
    
Updated with Puthon 3 syntax –  Paolo Nov 10 '11 at 14:31

Was going through the documentation. No clue what so ever for this.

Just a wild guess - We read text left-right so strings

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And we read numbers some other way? I don't think that this is related. –  Blin Nov 5 '11 at 13:41

Python 3 syntax (available in 2.6, too)

>>> print("{foo:>5s}\n{bar:>5d}".format(foo="a", bar=100))
    a
  100

Read the format spec. The alignment specifier here is the >.

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