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I'm on a Fedora 15 computer and I have a simple code that looks like this

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int main()
{
    int x[50], y[50];
    int i;
    FILE *f_in = fopen("readtest.dat","r");

    if (f_in == NULL) printf("No file...\n");
    else
    {
        i = 0;
        while (!feof(f_in))
        {
            fscanf(f_in,"%d %d",&x[i],&y[i]);
            printf("%d %d\n", x[i], y[i]);
            i++;
        }
        printf("I've read %d data.\n", i);
    }
return 0;
}

The file to be read is this

1   1
2   2
3   3
4   4
5   5

But I don't know why the output looks like this.

1   1
2   2
3   3
4   4
5   5
1250259108 1250140145
I've read 6 data.

I was thinking that I left a blank new line in the file, but I didn't. I double checked the file with both gedit and vim and no blank lines were found. Why am I reading this unexisting line?

share|improve this question
2  
c-faq.com/stdio/feof.html –  user786653 Nov 5 '11 at 11:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You should include a new line escape character in your fscanf

fscanf(f_in,"%d %d\n",&x[i],&y[i]);

Also dont forget to fclose your file

EDIT

I tried it and here are the results.

Without the \n

1 1
2 2
3 3
4 4
5 5
-1216418984 1
I've read 6 data.

With the \n

1 1
2 2
3 3
4 4
5 5
I've read 5 data.
share|improve this answer
    
That was the problem, adding the escape character worked. But I can't figure out why though. –  Marcello Massaro Nov 5 '11 at 12:00
    
fscanf processes all whitespace characters the same, so you could just do "%d %d ". If you really want to verify that it's done correctly, line-by-line, you should use fgets, which is infinitely harder to get wrong. –  Chris Lutz Nov 5 '11 at 12:06
    
Nice point about the white space. I agree with fgets but i just wanted to provide a working answer as close to the original code as possible. –  pnezis Nov 5 '11 at 12:13

Probably last call to fscanf functions failed.

These functions return the number of input items assigned. This can be fewer than provided for, or even zero, in the event of a matching failure.

Check its return value before printing. Something like:

v = fscanf(f_in,"%d %d",&x[i],&y[i]);
if (v) {
    // printf goes here
}
share|improve this answer

As user786653 said (by reference, at least) in his comment, "while !feof" is the wrong way to read a file in C. feof doesn't return true until you've hit the end of the file, and actually tried to read past it. So your program does an extra read, which fails.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for the correct answer (+1 also to user786653's comment) –  pmg Nov 5 '11 at 12:15

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