Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The code below compiles fine with VS2010 but fails to compile with gcc 4.6.1:

The error from gcc:

*C:...\Calculator_engine_impl.h|20|error: no match for call to '(std::string {aka std::basic_string}) (__gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator >&, __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator >&)'|*

#include "stdafx.h"


#include <iostream>
#include "Calculator_engine.h"

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    QString expression("1+2-3");
    auto beg = expression.begin();
    auto end = expression.end();
    while (beg != end)
    {
    qDebut() <<
     Calculator_engine<>::read_next_token_(beg,end);
    }
}

#ifndef CALCULATOR_ENGINE_H
#define CALCULATOR_ENGINE_H
#include <string>
#include <cctype>
using namespace std;
//#include "Incorrect_Expression.h"
template<class Int_T = long long>
class Calculator_engine
{
private:
    Calculator_engine();
    static Int_T expression(QString exp);
    template<class Forward_Iterator>
    static Int_T term_(Forward_Iterator& beg,Forward_Iterator& end);
public:

    template<class Forward_Iterator>
    static QString read_next_token_(Forward_Iterator& beg,Forward_Iterator& end);

public:

    static QString calculate(QString exp);
};

#include "Calculator_engine_impl.h"

#endif // CALCULATOR_ENGINE_H
#ifndef CALCULATOR_ENGINE_IMPL_H_INCLUDED
#define CALCULATOR_ENGINE_IMPL_H_INCLUDED
template<class Int_T>
class Calculator_engine;//[Forward decl]

template<class Int_T>
 template<class Forward_Iterator>
Int_T Calculator_engine<Int_T>::term_(Forward_Iterator& beg,Forward_Iterator& end)
{
    QChar token;
    Int_T result;
    switch(token)
    {
    case '*':
        break;
    case '/':
        break;
    }
}
template<class Int_T>
QString Calculator_engine<Int_T>::calculate(QString exp)
{
    Int_T result;
    auto beg = exp.begin();
    auto end = exp.end();
    while (beg != end)
    {
        QString term_ = read_next_token_(beg,end);
        QChar token = read_next_token_(beg,end);
    switch(token)
    {
    case '-':
        result -= term_(beg,end);
        break;
    case '+':
        result += term_(beg,end);
        break;
    }


    }

}

template<class Int_T>
Int_T Calculator_engine<Int_T>::expression(QString exp)
{

}


template<class Int_T>
template<class Forward_Iterator>
    QString Calculator_engine<Int_T>::read_next_token_(Forward_Iterator& beg,Forward_Iterator& end)
    {
        QString result;
        while(std::isdigit(*beg))
        {

        }
        return result;
    }

#endif // CALCULATOR_ENGINE_IMPL_H_INCLUDED
share|improve this question
3  
What line causes the error? –  BlackBear Nov 5 '11 at 14:57
3  
I don't see any reference to QString or QChar in your source code. Are you sure you posted the right bits? –  larsmans Nov 5 '11 at 14:58
    
@BlackBear line which causes the error: result -= term_(beg,end); this is from calculate fnc. –  smallB Nov 5 '11 at 15:03
    
@Iarsmans yes, that's true, the references are to char and string - that's the VS version. In code::blocks I use version with QString and QChar. –  smallB Nov 5 '11 at 15:04
1  
Why on earth are you naming both a local variable and a function term_? –  Mat Nov 5 '11 at 15:12

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have both a function named term_ and a local variable:

Int_T Calculator_engine<Int_T>::term_(Forward_Iterator& beg,Forward_Iterator& end)
//   ....

QString term_ = read_next_token_(beg,end);
//  ...  
result -= term_(beg,end);

GCC uses the innermost definition - in this case, your local QString. It then tries to find an operator()(QChar*&, QChar*&) to satisfy this call, but fails. Apparently visual studio does something different. I'm not entirely sure which is conforming to the spec - but I'd suspect GCC is getting it right here.

The solution, of course, is to not use the same name for a local variable and a function.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, and yes, gcc is most probably right. Since I've started using gcc I'm overwhelmed on the number of errors VS was compiling and gcc is refusing them. Good thing. –  smallB Nov 5 '11 at 15:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.