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int a=10;
switch(a)
{
case 0: printf("case 0");
         break;
case 1: printf("case 1");
         break;
}

above code is valid? see if i am very much sure that int a will not have any value rather than 1 and 0 then in that case can i avoid default: ?

What if in any case a value will be differ then 1 and 0 ?

Edit: i know this is silly question but i was thinking that perhaps it would be illegal or undefined behavior so just asked to make sure

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2  
Have you tried to actually execute this switch block with something other than 0 or 1? –  Chris Nov 5 '11 at 15:59
3  
i have tried but i was thinking that perhaps it would be illegal or undefined behavior so just asked to make sure –  Mr.32 Nov 5 '11 at 16:04

6 Answers 6

up vote 12 down vote accepted

The code is valid. If there is no default: label and none of the case labels match the "switched" value, then none of the controlled compound statement will be executed. Execution will continue from the end of the switch statement.

ISO/IEC 9899:1999, section 6.8.4.2:

[...] If no converted case constant expression matches and there is no default label, no part of the switch body is executed.

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It is perfectly legal code. If a is neither 0 or 1, then the switch block will be entirely skipped.

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As others have pointed out it is perfectly valid code. However, from a coding style perspective I prefer adding an empty default statement with a comment to make clear that I didn't unintentionally forget about it.

int a=10;
switch(a)
{
case 0: printf("case 0");
         break;
case 1: printf("case 1");
         break;
default: // do nothing;
         break;
}

The code generated with / without the default should be identical.

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1  
+1 for communicating intent. –  weberc2 Nov 20 '12 at 19:02

yes the above code is valid,

if the switch condition doesn't match any condition of the case and a default is not present the program execution go ahead exiting from the switch without doing anything.

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It's valid not to have a default case.

However, even if you are sure that you will not have any value rather than 1 and 0, it's a good practice to have a default case, to catch any other value (although it is theoretically impossible, it may appear in some circumstances, like buffer overflow) and print an error.

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You are assuming that it is an error not to match one of the case statements - probably true in this case. You may want to only perform an action some possible values of a variable and to just carry on in other cases. IMHO, this is a perfectly reasonable use of a switch statement. –  Charles Bailey Nov 5 '11 at 16:06
    
@Charles: He wrote in the question: see if i am very much sure that int a will not have any value rather than 1 and 0 then in that case can i avoid default: –  Igor Oks Nov 5 '11 at 16:07
1  
I wasn't disagreeing with you, I'm sorry if it came across like that. I was just pointing out that although, in general, it is good practice to have a default label, it's not necessarily bad practice to omit one. –  Charles Bailey Nov 5 '11 at 16:09
    
@CharlesBailey It seems very much worthwhile to include the default case if for no other reason than documenting that you at least considered the default case (even if there is no executable code therein). Given that there is relatively high benefit to including it and no real advantage from omitting it, I would say it's very good practice to include it. –  weberc2 Nov 20 '12 at 19:01

if you would try to do that without default >> else the body of the statement doesn't complete and it doesn't work... case >> if & elseif switch statement like if statement

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How does this answer the question? And what does it add that wasn't already said in the accepted answer? (Also, you should consider losing the exclamation marks.) –  Keith Thompson Aug 20 '14 at 0:28

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