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I was looking at this code and had a few questions. I did some digging in a jquery fundamentals manual and on google but didn't find a straightforward answer.

this is the full code

function slideSwitch()
{
    var $active = $('#slideshow IMG.active');

    if ( $active.length == 0 ) $active = $('#slideshow IMG:last');

    var $next =  $active.next().length ? $active.next()
    : $('#slideshow IMG:first');


    $active.addClass('last-active');

    $next.css({opacity: 0.0})
         .addClass('active')
         .animate({opacity: 1.0}, 1000, function() {
             $active.removeClass('active last-active');
          });
}

The first thing that strikes me is that he makes an inline if statement w/o brackets, that's cool and I didn't know you could do that. However, is it something that follows good coding standards or does it not matter?

Also the next line where he declares var $next. I've never seen a variable with those kinds of conditions in it. I'm guessing that he's saying either input $active.next() and if the length is 0 than $active.next() is going to be the first img in the slide show. I'm not quite sure what the operands mean.

any insight?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The first thing that strikes me is that he makes an inline if statement w/o brackets

I think you mean braces {}.

that's cool and I didn't know you could do that. However, is it something that follows good coding standards or does it not matter?

It is generally considered to be poor code style. It is too easy to come along later to add some more code to an if branch and not realise that the brace-less syntax was used.

JSLint will complain about that.

Also the next line where he declares var $next. I've never seen a variable with those kinds of conditions in it.

That's a conditional (ternary) operator.

return condition ? expr1 : expr2

is equivalent to:

if (condition) {
    return expr1;
} else {
    return expr2;
}

All of this is JavaScript. It has nothing to do with the jQuery library.

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aren't the selectors using the jquery library? –  Brodie Nov 5 '11 at 16:45
    
@Brodie — You weren't asking about the selectors. –  Quentin Nov 5 '11 at 17:17

It seems like you need a refresher in using conditional statements:

  1. A standard if executes a statement when the condition is evaluated to true/nonzero. A statement can be just that - a statement, or several statements within brackets.
  2. A ternary conditional expression is used for assignment purposes. It takes a condition, evaluates it and if it evaluates to true/nonzero it returns the first expression after the ?. If not, it returns the expression after the :.

Using an if with just a single statement makes sense, although the statement is usually pushed to the next line and indented for readability.

Using the ternary if is ok, as long as it does not contain nested expressions that make readability a challenge.

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1) Although that style is perfectly legal, it's considered a better style to use braces always with if statements. Without braces it's hard to figure out the outcome of constructs like:

if (condition1) 
  if (condition2)
    dothat();
  else
    dothis();
else
  dosomethingelse();

So does the first else belong to the condition2 check or condition1, it's hard to tell. And because it's widespread to use K&R "braces on the same line" style in JavaScript, omitting space can cause other bugs:

while(true) {
if (condition1)
   dothat();
   andthendothattoo();
}

because of the indenting it's easy for programmer to assume braces are used and mistakenly think andthendothattoo() would be called only when condition1 is true. To avoid such mistakes using parantheses always is a good practice.

2) That's called a ternary operator: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/be21c7hw(v=vs.94).aspx

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