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I have been reading the ISO 14882:2003. It says:

s-char:
any member of the source character set except the double-quote ", backslash \, or new-line character escape-sequence
universal-character-name

Now, about new-line character I see a problem when the line ending is '\r'
I wrote a small cpp program:

#include <fstream>
#include <string>
int main()
{
    const char* program=""
        "#include <string>\n"
        "int main()\n"
        "{\n"
        "  std::string s;\n"
        "  //s=\"\r"
        "  //\r"
        "  //\r"
        "  //\r"
        "  //\";\n"
        "  s=\"\\xAE\\xfffactory\\xAE\\xffaction\";\n"
        "  return 0;\n"
        "}\n"
        ;
    std::ofstream file("file.cpp", std::ios_base::trunc);
    file << program;
    file.close();
    return 0;
}

On Windows, file.cpp (as read in VS editor) is:

#include <string>
int main()
{
  std::string s;
  //s="
  //
  //
  //
  //";
  s="\xAE\xfffactory\xAE\xffaction";
  return 0;
}

When compiling file.cpp, VS triggers and error in line 6, instead of line 10.

On Linux, file.cpp (as read in emacs) is:

#include <string>
int main()
{
  std::string s;
  //s="^M  //^M  //^M  //^M  //";
  s="\xAE\xfffactory\xAE\xffaction";
  return 0;
}

Compiling file.cpp with gcc I get an error in line 10, not in line 6.

What should I conclude from this?

share|improve this question
    
Carriage return is to return the "carriage" on old typewrite-like printers to the beginning of the line, not to advance to the next line. UNIX and UNIX-like systems use only \n as new-line characters, while Windows use \r\n. Apparently VS can handle single carriage-returns as line ending, but many editor in the UNIX-world don't, since technically it's not the end of the line. –  Joachim Pileborg Nov 5 '11 at 16:31
    
If your smart enough to be reading ISO standards I'm surprised you were not able to figure this out with a simple search. Seems like a question you already knew the answer to. –  Joe McGrath Nov 5 '11 at 16:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Section 2.1 [lex.phases]. The first phase of translation is:

Physical source file characters are mapped, in an implementation-defined manner, to the basic source character set (introducing new-line characters for end-of-line indicators) if necessary. ...

In other words, the implementation is free to use whatever line ending convention it wants, and turn that into newline characters during the first phase of translation.

Practically speaking, you should be safe using the newline character for line endings on any modern compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for ISO reference. It becomes more clear now. Practically end-of-line is OS dependent. new-line NL(LF) is clear (Table. 5). The compiler behavior is implementation-defined. –  grayasm Nov 5 '11 at 19:56

You should conclude that:

  1. VS editor understands any line-endings and so displays it as multiple lines (well, this is a known feature).
  2. MSVC compiler doesn't understand \r line-endings, so it actually counts the "; line as the 6th line.
  3. emacs doesn't understand \r line-endings (at least by default) so it shows you the source in a single line.
  4. GCC understands any line endings, so it doesn't loose the count.

Ah, also the quote you provided from the standard is unrelated. The new-line there refers to the source character set, not the \r and \n in strings. The grammar rule you quoted just excludes string literal such as:

const char* s = "some text, here comes 'new-line'
    ha ha ";
share|improve this answer
    
I am writing a small lexer. I have used "string-literal" from c++ standard as a grammar rule, which involves "s-char" rule. In my tests any string-literal involving CR inside double quotes was accepted. I tried gcc and mvc and so I observed the difference. However @Bartholomew had also a good point. Thank for the answer. –  grayasm Nov 5 '11 at 20:13

Windows and linux use different line ending conventions. On linux, the end of line is 0x0A, and on windows its 0x0D, 0x0A. C/C++ programs are themselves text files, and are often interoperable across platforms, so long as you conform to the text conventions on the platform .

the dos2unix(1) tool is purpose build for just this task.

Alternatively, since you're producing this code dynamically in your own tool, you could provide an option that tells it to use one line-ending style or the other.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for tool recommendation. I will give it a try. –  grayasm Nov 5 '11 at 21:14

Now, about new-line character I see a problem when the line ending is '\r'...

'\r' is a carriage return and not a newline -- so Im not sure what the problems is?

Windows chose to make some magic of representing \r as newlines, but that does not mean that they actually are newlines

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