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I want to run a shell script with this usage:

./run A.txt B.xml

A.txt contain some statistic:

Accesses = 1
Hits = 2
Misses = 3
Evictions = 4
Retries = 5

B.xml looks like:

<stat name="total_accesses" value="0"/>
<stat name="total_misses" value="0"/>
<stat name="conflicts" value="0"/>  

I want to replace some stats in B.xml from A.txt. For example, I want to

1- find "Accesses" in A.txt
2- find "total_accesses" in B.xml
3- replace 0 with 1
1- find "Misses" in A.txt
2- find "total_misses" in B.xml
3- replace 0 with 3

So B.xml will look like:

<stat name="total_accesses" value="1"/>
<stat name="total_misses" value="3"/>
<stat name="conflicts" value="0"/>  

I want to do that with shell "sed" command. However I find it quite complex as the regexp is hard to understand.

Does "sed" help me in this problem or I have to find another way?

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1  
Use a proper XML tool. –  larsmans Nov 5 '11 at 16:45
2  
I sugggest writing a litte script, e.g. in Perl, reading the lines of file A and using some stock XML module to write file B. It's probably gonna be quite complex to do this with a sed one-liner because obviously you need to translate token in file A to other tokens in the XML. –  dboehmer Nov 5 '11 at 16:46
    
@larsmans: which tool? can you name? –  mahmood Nov 5 '11 at 16:48
    
@halo: Can you point to an example? –  mahmood Nov 5 '11 at 16:49
    
"total_misses" should be "3" in the final B.xml. See my answer. –  J.F. Sebastian Nov 6 '11 at 0:19

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It might be a bit heavy-weight for such a simple case, but here's a Python script that does the job:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import sys
import xml.etree.ElementTree as etree

# read A.txt; fill stats
stats = {}
for line in open(sys.argv[1]):
    if line.strip():
        name, _, count = line.partition('=')
        stats["total_"+name.lower().strip()] = count.strip()

# read B.xml; fix to make it a valid xml; replace stat[@value]
root = etree.fromstring("<root>%s</root>" % open(sys.argv[2]).read())
for s in root:
    if s.get('name') in stats:
        s.set('value', stats[s.get('name')])
    print etree.tostring(s),

Example

$ python fill-xml-template.py A.txt B.xml 
<stat name="total_accesses" value="1" />
<stat name="total_misses" value="3" />
<stat name="conflicts" value="0" /> 

To process input files incrementally or to makes changes inplace you could use the following:

#!/usr/bin/env python
import fileinput
import sys
import xml.etree.ElementTree as etree

try: sys.argv.remove('-i')
except ValueError: 
    inplace = False
else: inplace = True # make changes inplace if `-i` option is specified

# read A.txt; fill stats
stats = {}
for line in open(sys.argv.pop(1)):
    if line.strip():
        name, _, count = line.partition('=')
        stats["total_"+name.lower().strip()] = count.strip()

# read input; replace stat[@value]
for line in fileinput.input(inplace=inplace):
    s = etree.fromstring(line)
    if s.get('name') in stats:
        s.set('value', stats[s.get('name')])
    print etree.tostring(s)

Example

$ python fill-xml-template.py A.txt B.xml -i

It can read from stdin or process several files:

$ cat B.xml | python fill-xml-template.py A.txt
<stat name="total_accesses" value="1" />
<stat name="total_misses" value="3" />
<stat name="conflicts" value="0" />
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Here is a shell script that does what you want:


#!/bin/bash
while read line
do
    key=`echo $line | cut -d' ' -f1`
    value=`echo $line | cut -d' ' -f3`
    xmlLine=`grep -i $key $2`
    if [ -n "$xmlLine" ]; then
        for num in `seq 5`
        do
            field[${num}]=`echo "$xmlLine" | cut -d'"' -f${num}`
        done
        echo ${field[1]}\"${field[2]}\"${field[3]}\"$value\"${field[5]}
    fi
done 

You can copy it to a file say A.sh , give run permissions to it (chmod +x A.sh) and then:

./A.sh A.txt B.xml

Please mind that this code is not suitable for production and regex is paramount for these scripts.

share|improve this answer

while you can hack this on the command line, I'd recommend not to do this.

XML is way too fragile to be handled this way - use a proper XML library and parse the XML before manipulating it. Otherwise you could easily end up with broken XML. e.g. write a script in Ruby, Python, or Perl and use an XML library.

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