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Running a default installation of Ubuntu 11.10 with the latest version of NetBeans. I have something similar to the following:

class MyClass {
    public:
        Type1 RunAlgo();
    private:
        Type2 Run();
}

Type1 MyClass::RunAlgo() {
    //additional code
    return Run();
}

Type2 Run() {
    //additional code
    Type2 obj;
    return obj;
}

Type1 and Type2 are completely unrelated. I came upon this by making a typo in the return type when I was writing the Run() method and was amazed that it compiled. I am just wondering why this does not return an error and just compiles fine? What am I missing?

EDIT: New sample. This does generate an error as a stand alone project. Can't seem to spot why the real project would indeed compile.

class Node { };

//only difference here is that in my code I have a custom comparer
typedef map<Node*, map<Node*, double> > Network; 

class HMM {
    Network _network;
};

class Algorithm {
    public:
        HMM RunAlgo();
    private:
        Network _network;
        Network Run();
};

HMM Algorithm::RunAlgo() {
    return Run();
}

Network Algorithm::Run() {
    return _network;
}

EDIT2:

I apologize for my badly formulated question and example. I will be more careful in the future about examples. I've been working for a bit over 10 hours and lost focus. The following example reproduces my case:

#include <map>

using std::map;

class Node {

};

typedef map<Node*, map<Node*, double> > Network;

class HMM {
    public:
        HMM(const Network& network) {};
    Network _network;
};


class TestClass {
    public:
        HMM RunAlgo(int x, int y);
    private:
        Network _network;
        Network Run();
};

HMM TestClass::RunAlgo(int x, int y) {
    return Run();
}

Network TestClass::Run() {
    return _network;
}  

After adding that specific constructor to the HMM class it compiles without problems. I didn't know this could be done as this is the first time I encounter this case. Again I apologize if I wasted your time and I appreciate you trying to help me.

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1  
Are "some parameters" and "some params" the typo? Or the missing semicolon? Are they part of the question? Please present your real testcase so that we don't have to waste our precious time guessing. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 5 '11 at 17:13
    
My mistake. Will edit out the some parameters. They are not important to the case. I apologize for the confusion. –  Morat Nov 5 '11 at 17:15
    
Maybe Type1 and Type2 aren't as unrelated as you think. Please post their declarations (at least their constructors & assignment operators) –  Mat Nov 5 '11 at 17:16
    
are you actually calling and using RunAlgo(...)? –  aleph_null Nov 5 '11 at 17:16
    
@Morat: at least try your samples. You're missing ; at the end of the class declarations. And even with that, GCC rejects the code: error: conversion from ‘Network’ to non-scalar type ‘HMM’ requested. –  Mat Nov 5 '11 at 17:41

2 Answers 2

After fixing the mistakes in your non-testcase, my compiler does error out.

Your statement that Type1 and Type2 are unrelated must be false.

Take care on a real testcase next time.

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You didn't show your actual code; the example you gave us don't compile (GCC 4.6 on Debian/Sid/AMD64)

% g++ -Wall exmorat.cc 
exmorat.cc:3:9: error: 'Type1' does not name a type
exmorat.cc:5:9: error: 'Type2' does not name a type
exmorat.cc:8:7: error: expected initializer before 'MyClass'

But what you describes may happen when you have conversions or casting involved. You should show your actual code (or a simplified code which exhibits the symptoms) to get real help.

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1  
He/she should already be working with a simplified piece of code (or a "testcase") as part of the basic fundamentals of debugging. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 5 '11 at 17:17
    
The classes are too big to be post them here. I tried reproducing this scenario with a simplified version of the code but in that case it does produce an error. I can't seem to see any noticeable difference between the two scenarios. –  Morat Nov 5 '11 at 17:29

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