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int main(){
    fork();
}

I know this is a newbie question, but my understanding is that the parent process now will fork a new child process exactly as the parent one, which means that the child should also fork a child process and so on... In reality, this only generates one child process. I cant understand what code will the child be executing?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The child process begins executing at the exact point where the last one left off - after the fork statement. If you wanted to fork forever, you'd have to put it in a while loop.

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As everybody mentioned, the child also starts executing after fork() has finished. Thus, it doesn't call fork again.

You could see it clearly in the very common usage like this:

int main()
{
    if (fork())
    {
        // you are in parent. The return value of fork was the pid of the child
        // here you can do stuff and perhaps eventually `wait` on the child
    }
    else
    {
        // you are in the child. The return value of fork was 0
        // you may often see here an `exec*` command
    }
}
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You missed a semi-colon.

But the child (and also the parent) is continuing just after the fork happenned. From the point of view of application programming, fork (like all system calls) is "atomic".

The only difference between the two processes (which after the fork have conceptually separate memory spaces) is the result of the fork.

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If the child went on to call fork, the child would have two forks (the one that created it and the one that it then made) while the parent would only have one (the one that gave it a child). The nature of fork is that one process calls it and two processes return from it.

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