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How would I make a function that allows you to open up brackets after the calling of the function, and declare code inside of the brackets, similar to this:

openScopeBrackets();
{
//...code here
}
closeScopeBrackets();

I've seen this with OpenGL, too:

glBegin(GL_TRIANGLES);
{
//...code here
}
glEnd()

Please help me...

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what does glBegin do ? –  Avinash Nov 5 '11 at 18:18

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Difficult to say what you want to do, but a Local scope is created just by adding { } inside the function body. The variables declared within this scope will not be visible outside it.

void doSomething()
{
    int i;
    {

        //Local Scope


    }
}
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does this work the same for function calls? –  Omri Nov 5 '11 at 18:13
1  
@TehCodr you can put a pair of brackets almost anywhere to create a new scope. And that's all it does: create a new scope, so that variables declared inside the brackets will disappear at the ending }. –  Seth Carnegie Nov 5 '11 at 18:14
    
@TehCodr: anywhere you put { & } creates a local scope. –  Alok Save Nov 5 '11 at 18:15
    
Thanks all for your help :D –  Omri Nov 5 '11 at 18:16
    
@TehCodr: It's not clear what effect you think it should have "with function calls". Using {} to create a scope is independent of any function calls. So it "works" with function calls, but it just does the same thing it would do without a function call. –  sth Nov 5 '11 at 18:17

In C/C++, a function can be called from any other function only. But we can NOT define functions in other functions. So, it is NOT possible to first call the function and then write the code for the called function.

void fName(){
    otherFunction(){//NOT allowed
        ...definition for otherFunction
    }
}
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1  
GCC accepts that as a language extension called nested function gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc-4.6.2/gcc/Nested-Functions.html but it only works for C, not for C++ –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 5 '11 at 18:19
    
I don't want to try func-ception, I just want to call a function, and then put declarations that go after the function, specific to the function, in brackets. Refer to glBegin and glEnd... –  Omri Nov 5 '11 at 18:28

If you want something to happen at the beginning and at the end of a block, you might use constructor/destructor for that.

Look at QMutexLocker as an inspirational example to see what I mean.

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