Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to solve the problem of positioning N queens on NxN board without row, column and diagonal conflicts. I use an algorithm with minimizing the conflicts. Firstly, on each column randomly a queen is positioned. After that, of all conflict queens randomly one is chosen and for her column are calculated the conflicts of each possible position. Then, the queen moves to the best position with min number of conflicts. It works, but it runs extremely slow. My goal is to make it run fast for 10000 queens. Would you, please, suggest me some improvements or maybe notice some mistakes in my logic?

Here is my code:

public class Queen {

int column;
int row;
int d1;
int d2;

public Queen(int column, int row, int d1, int d2) {
    super();
    this.column = column;
    this.row = row;
    this.d1 = d1;
    this.d2 = d2;
}

@Override
public String toString() {
    return "Queen [column=" + column + ", row=" + row + ", d1=" + d1
            + ", d2=" + d2 + "]";
}

@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    return ((Queen)obj).column == this.column && ((Queen)obj).row == this.row;
}   

}

And:

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Random;


public class SolveQueens {
public static boolean printBoard = false;
public static int N = 100;
public static int maxSteps = 2000000;
public static int[] queens = new int[N];
public static Random random = new Random();

public static HashSet<Queen> q = new HashSet<Queen>();

public static HashSet rowConfl[] = new HashSet[N];
public static HashSet d1Confl[] = new HashSet[2*N - 1];
public static HashSet d2Confl[] = new HashSet[2*N -  1];

public static void init () {
    int r;
    rowConfl = new HashSet[N];
    d1Confl = new HashSet[2*N - 1];
    d2Confl = new HashSet[2*N - 1];
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        r = random.nextInt(N);
        queens[i] = r;
        Queen k = new Queen(i, r, i + r, N - 1 +  i - r);
        q.add(k);
        if (rowConfl[k.row] == null) {
            rowConfl[k.row] = new HashSet<Queen>();
        }
        if (d1Confl[k.d1] == null) {
            d1Confl[k.d1] = new HashSet<Queen>();
        }
        if (d2Confl[k.d2] == null) {
            d2Confl[k.d2] = new HashSet<Queen>();
        }
        ((HashSet<Queen>)rowConfl[k.row]).add(k);
        ((HashSet<Queen>)d1Confl[k.d1]).add(k);
        ((HashSet<Queen>)d2Confl[k.d2]).add(k);
    }
}

public static void print () {
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < N; j++) {
            System.out.print(queens[i] == j ? "♕ " : "◻◻◻ ");
        }
        System.out.println();
    }  
    System.out.println();
}


public static boolean checkItLinear() {

    Queen r = choseConflictQueen();

    if (r == null) {
        return true;
    }

    Queen newQ = findNewBestPosition(r);

    q.remove(r);
    q.add(newQ);
    rowConfl[r.row].remove(r);
    d1Confl[r.d1].remove(r);
    d2Confl[r.d2].remove(r);
    if (rowConfl[newQ.row] == null) {
        rowConfl[newQ.row] = new HashSet<Queen>();
    }
    if (d1Confl[newQ.d1] == null) {
        d1Confl[newQ.d1] = new HashSet<Queen>();
    }
    if (d2Confl[newQ.d2] == null) {
        d2Confl[newQ.d2] = new HashSet<Queen>();
    }
    ((HashSet<Queen>)rowConfl[newQ.row]).add(newQ);
    ((HashSet<Queen>)d1Confl[newQ.d1]).add(newQ);
    ((HashSet<Queen>)d2Confl[newQ.d2]).add(newQ);
    queens[r.column] = newQ.row;
    return false;
}

public static Queen choseConflictQueen () {

    HashSet<Queen> conflictSet = new HashSet<Queen>();
    boolean hasConflicts = false;

    for (int i = 0; i < 2*N - 1; i++) {
        if (i < N && rowConfl[i] != null) {
            hasConflicts = hasConflicts || rowConfl[i].size() > 1;
            conflictSet.addAll(rowConfl[i]);
        }
        if (d1Confl[i] != null) {
            hasConflicts = hasConflicts || d1Confl[i].size() > 1;
            conflictSet.addAll(d1Confl[i]);
        }
        if (d2Confl[i] != null) {
            hasConflicts = hasConflicts || d2Confl[i].size() > 1;
            conflictSet.addAll(d2Confl[i]);
        }
    }
    if (hasConflicts) {
        int c = random.nextInt(conflictSet.size());
        return (Queen) conflictSet.toArray()[c];
    }

    return null;
}

public static Queen findNewBestPosition(Queen old) {        
    int[] row = new int[N];
    int min = Integer.MAX_VALUE;
    int minInd = old.row;

    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        if (rowConfl[i] != null) {
            row[i] = rowConfl[i].size();
        }
        if (d1Confl[old.column + i] != null) {
            row[i] += d1Confl[old.column + i].size();
        }
        if (d2Confl[N - 1 +  old.column - i] != null) {
            row[i] += d2Confl[N - 1 +  old.column - i].size();
        }
        if (i == old.row) {
            row[i] = row[i] - 3;
        }

        if (row[i] <= min && i != minInd) {
            min = row[i];
            minInd = i;
        }
    }

    return new Queen(old.column, minInd, old.column + minInd, N - 1 +  old.column - minInd);
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
        long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        init();
        int steps = 0;
        while(!checkItLinear()) {
            if (++steps > maxSteps) {
                init();
                steps = 0;
            }
        }
        long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("Done for " + (endTime - startTime) + "ms\n");

        if(printBoard){
            print(); 
        }


}
}

Edit:

Here is my a-little-bit-optimized solution with removing some unused objects and putting the queens on diagonal positions when initializing.

import java.util.Random;
import java.util.Vector;


public class SolveQueens {
public static boolean PRINT_BOARD = true;
public static int N = 10;
public static int MAX_STEPS = 5000;

public static int[] queens = new int[N];
public static Random random = new Random();


public static int[] rowConfl = new int[N];
public static int[] d1Confl = new int[2*N - 1];
public static int[] d2Confl = new int[2*N - 1];

public static Vector<Integer> conflicts = new Vector<Integer>();

public static void init () {
    random = new Random();
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        queens[i] = i;
    }
}

public static int getD1Pos (int col, int row) {
    return col + row;
}

public static int getD2Pos (int col, int row) {
    return N - 1 + col - row;
}

public static void print () {
    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        for (int j = 0; j < N; j++) {
            System.out.print(queens[i] == j ? "Q " : "* ");
        }
        System.out.println();
    }  
    System.out.println();
}


public static boolean hasConflicts() {

    generateConflicts();

    if (conflicts.isEmpty()) {
        return false;
    }

    int r = random.nextInt(conflicts.size());
    int conflQueenCol = conflicts.get(r);
    int currentRow = queens[conflQueenCol];
    int bestRow = currentRow;
    int minConfl = getConflicts(conflQueenCol, queens[conflQueenCol]) - 3;
    int tempConflCount;

    for (int i = 0; i < N ; i++) {
        tempConflCount = getConflicts(conflQueenCol, i);
        if (i != currentRow && tempConflCount <= minConfl) {
            minConfl = tempConflCount;
            bestRow = i;
        }
    }
    queens[conflQueenCol] = bestRow;
    return true;
}

public static void generateConflicts () {

    conflicts = new Vector<Integer>();

    rowConfl = new int[N];
    d1Confl = new int[2*N - 1];
    d2Confl = new int[2*N -  1];

    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        int r = queens[i];
        rowConfl[r]++;
        d1Confl[getD1Pos(i, r)]++;
        d2Confl[getD2Pos(i, r)]++;
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        int conflictsCount = getConflicts(i, queens[i]) - 3;
        if (conflictsCount > 0) {
            conflicts.add(i);
        }
    }
}

public static int getConflicts(int col, int row) {
    return rowConfl[row] + d1Confl[getD1Pos(col, row)] + d2Confl[getD2Pos(col, row)];
}



public static void main(String[] args) {
        long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        init();
        int steps = 0;
        while(hasConflicts()) {
            if (++steps > MAX_STEPS) {
                init();
                steps = 0;
            }
        }
        long endTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
        System.out.println("Done for " + (endTime - startTime) + "ms\n");

        if(PRINT_BOARD){
            print(); 
        }
}

}

share|improve this question
    
You're aware how absolutely gigantic the number of even unique solutions for 10k queens would be? –  Voo Nov 5 '11 at 18:44
    
Yes. But I'm looking for only one solution, not all of them. –  brain_damage Nov 5 '11 at 19:00

3 Answers 3

Comments would have been helpful :)

Rather than recreating your conflict set and your "worst conflict" queen everything, could you create it once, and then just update the changed rows/columns?

EDIT 0: I tried playing around with your code a bit. Since the code is randomized, it's hard to find out if a change is good or not, since you might start with a good initial state or a crappy one. I tried making 10 runs with 10 queens, and got wildly different answers, but results are below.

I psuedo-profiled to see which statements were being executed the most, and it turns out the inner loop statements in chooseConflictQueen are executed the most. I tried inserting a break to pull the first conflict queen if found, but it didn't seem to help much.

Stats

Grouping only runs that took more than a second:

More Stats

I realize I only have 10 runs, which is not really enough to be statistically valid, but hey.

So adding breaks didn't seem to help. I think a constructive solution will likely be faster, but randomness will again make it harder to check.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I edited it :) But it's still very slow. –  brain_damage Nov 5 '11 at 21:22

Your approach is good : Local search algorithm with minimum-conflicts constraint. I would suggest try improving your initial state. Instead of randomly placing all queens, 1 per column, try to place them so that you minimize the number of conflicts. An example would be to try placing you next queen based on the position of the previous one ... or maybe position of previous two ... Then you local search will have less problematic columns to deal with.

share|improve this answer
    
I will try. Благодаря! :) –  brain_damage Nov 6 '11 at 7:53

If you randomly select, you could be selecting the same state as a previous state. Theoretically, you might never find a solution even if there is one.

I think you woud be better to iterate normally through the states.

Also, are you sure boards other than 8x8 are solvable? By inspection, 2x2 is not, 3x3 is not, 4x4 is not.

share|improve this answer
    
Testing every possible state for n-queens would mean we have (n^2 over n) possible orderings (even for n=8 that's 4.426.165.368). Which is WAY too big for this to work. Also yes, the number of solutions explodes pretty fast, so there do exist solutions for larger fields. –  Voo Nov 6 '11 at 19:51
    
@Voo yeah but some positions are reflections/rotations of others and are therefore "the same", so you could recognise these and eliminate many branches, probably in the way you iterate (rather than storing n^2 states!). It's like the difference between combinations and permutations. –  Bohemian Nov 6 '11 at 23:05
    
In which case you'd have to store computed states which would also explode - so some memoization, but then you have the problem on how to compute equal situations (you'd need some way to normalize matrizes so you can look them up). Or maybe we can cleverly branch, don't know. But even if you would only have to compute every 10^9th state we would look at over 10^232 possible states. That's just out of the question - you need to solve this with some clever heuristics non deterministically. –  Voo Nov 6 '11 at 23:19

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.